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Can Universal Precautions Spread Disease?

Can Universal Precautions Spread Disease? Abstract In his very informative article about the century-old lessons from syphilis,1 Meyer tells us that "Calomel ointment supplanted the use of carbolic acid, which had been criticized for causing eczema and fissures of the hands, thus enhancing (with welldocumented prophylactic failures) instead of retarding the spread of infection." Meyer also says that "William Halsted (1852 to 1922) requested the Goodyear Rubber Co to make thin rubber gloves to protect his and his nurse's hands from harsh antiseptic solutions used in the operating room." With the new emphasis on washing before and after every patient contact, the same problem may be reappearing. A busy doctor can see 30 patients a day. Will any skin tolerate 60 washings, especially in the winter, when hands tend to crack and bleed? My skin won't, even though I use a scrub that contains lanolin and aloe vera, and I doubt others' will, either, judging References 1. Meyer GS. Occupational infection in health care . Arch Intern Med . 1993;153: 2439-2447.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

Can Universal Precautions Spread Disease?

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume 154 (10) – May 23, 1994

Can Universal Precautions Spread Disease?

Abstract

Abstract In his very informative article about the century-old lessons from syphilis,1 Meyer tells us that "Calomel ointment supplanted the use of carbolic acid, which had been criticized for causing eczema and fissures of the hands, thus enhancing (with welldocumented prophylactic failures) instead of retarding the spread of infection." Meyer also says that "William Halsted (1852 to 1922) requested the Goodyear Rubber Co to make thin rubber gloves to protect his and his...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1994 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9926
eISSN
1538-3679
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1994.00420100151023
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In his very informative article about the century-old lessons from syphilis,1 Meyer tells us that "Calomel ointment supplanted the use of carbolic acid, which had been criticized for causing eczema and fissures of the hands, thus enhancing (with welldocumented prophylactic failures) instead of retarding the spread of infection." Meyer also says that "William Halsted (1852 to 1922) requested the Goodyear Rubber Co to make thin rubber gloves to protect his and his nurse's hands from harsh antiseptic solutions used in the operating room." With the new emphasis on washing before and after every patient contact, the same problem may be reappearing. A busy doctor can see 30 patients a day. Will any skin tolerate 60 washings, especially in the winter, when hands tend to crack and bleed? My skin won't, even though I use a scrub that contains lanolin and aloe vera, and I doubt others' will, either, judging References 1. Meyer GS. Occupational infection in health care . Arch Intern Med . 1993;153: 2439-2447.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 23, 1994

References