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Can Ophthalmologists Achieve Better Blood Glucose Control in Their Diabetic Patients?

Can Ophthalmologists Achieve Better Blood Glucose Control in Their Diabetic Patients? Effect of Personalized Diabetes Risk Assessments on Glycemic Control Original Investigation Research Invited Commentary Can Ophthalmologists Achieve Better Blood Glucose Control in Their Diabetic Patients? Robert N. Frank, MD Ophthalmology is generally considered to be limited to dis- standing of the importance of good diabetes control, and orders of the eye and its adnexa. Diabetes mellitus, however, they received immediate feedback if this understanding was is a systemic disease that we encounter frequently in our oph- insufficient. The study was planned for 2 years but was thalmic practices because of its ocular complications, espe- stopped after 1 year when it became clear that no significant cially diabetic retinopathy. differences in HbA levels were developing between the 1c When, after years of contro- standard care and intervention groups in either the annual Related article page 888 versy, 2 seminal randomized or the more frequent follow-up cohorts. In addition, in none clinical trials, the Diabetes of these groups was there a significant decrease in HbA 1c Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and the UK Prospec- level during the follow-up period. tive Diabetes Study (UKPDS), clearly found that near-normal The authors of this study do not speculate why their in- blood glucose http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Can Ophthalmologists Achieve Better Blood Glucose Control in Their Diabetic Patients?

JAMA Ophthalmology , Volume 133 (8) – Aug 1, 2015

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2015 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2015.2258
pmid
26270401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Effect of Personalized Diabetes Risk Assessments on Glycemic Control Original Investigation Research Invited Commentary Can Ophthalmologists Achieve Better Blood Glucose Control in Their Diabetic Patients? Robert N. Frank, MD Ophthalmology is generally considered to be limited to dis- standing of the importance of good diabetes control, and orders of the eye and its adnexa. Diabetes mellitus, however, they received immediate feedback if this understanding was is a systemic disease that we encounter frequently in our oph- insufficient. The study was planned for 2 years but was thalmic practices because of its ocular complications, espe- stopped after 1 year when it became clear that no significant cially diabetic retinopathy. differences in HbA levels were developing between the 1c When, after years of contro- standard care and intervention groups in either the annual Related article page 888 versy, 2 seminal randomized or the more frequent follow-up cohorts. In addition, in none clinical trials, the Diabetes of these groups was there a significant decrease in HbA 1c Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and the UK Prospec- level during the follow-up period. tive Diabetes Study (UKPDS), clearly found that near-normal The authors of this study do not speculate why their in- blood glucose

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 2015

References