Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults

Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults Jean A. Welsh, MPH, RN Context Dietary carbohydrates have been associated with dyslipidemia, a lipid pro- file known to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Added sugars (caloric sweeteners Andrea Sharma, PhD, MPH used as ingredients in processed or prepared foods) are an increasing and potentially Jerome L. Abramson, PhD modifiable component in the US diet. No known studies have examined the associa- Viola Vaccarino, MD, PhD tion between the consumption of added sugars and lipid measures. Cathleen Gillespie, MS Objective To assess the association between consumption of added sugars and blood lipid levels in US adults. Miriam B. Vos, MD, MSPH Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study among US adults (n=6113) NCREASED CARBOHYDRATE CON- from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006. sumption has been associated with Respondents were grouped by intake of added sugars using limits specified in dietary lower high-density lipoprotein cho- recommendations (5% [reference group], 5%-10%, 10%-17.5%, 17.5%- 25%, and 25% of total calories). Linear regression was used to estimate adjusted Ilesterol (HDL-C) levels, higher tri- mean lipid levels. Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios of glyceride levels, and higher low- dyslipidemia. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/caloric-sweetener-consumption-and-dyslipidemia-among-us-adults-0tqN2BykmQ
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.449
pmid
20407058
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ORIGINAL CONTRIBUTION Caloric Sweetener Consumption and Dyslipidemia Among US Adults Jean A. Welsh, MPH, RN Context Dietary carbohydrates have been associated with dyslipidemia, a lipid pro- file known to increase cardiovascular disease risk. Added sugars (caloric sweeteners Andrea Sharma, PhD, MPH used as ingredients in processed or prepared foods) are an increasing and potentially Jerome L. Abramson, PhD modifiable component in the US diet. No known studies have examined the associa- Viola Vaccarino, MD, PhD tion between the consumption of added sugars and lipid measures. Cathleen Gillespie, MS Objective To assess the association between consumption of added sugars and blood lipid levels in US adults. Miriam B. Vos, MD, MSPH Design, Setting, and Participants Cross-sectional study among US adults (n=6113) NCREASED CARBOHYDRATE CON- from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 1999-2006. sumption has been associated with Respondents were grouped by intake of added sugars using limits specified in dietary lower high-density lipoprotein cho- recommendations (5% [reference group], 5%-10%, 10%-17.5%, 17.5%- 25%, and 25% of total calories). Linear regression was used to estimate adjusted Ilesterol (HDL-C) levels, higher tri- mean lipid levels. Logistic regression was used to determine adjusted odds ratios of glyceride levels, and higher low- dyslipidemia.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 21, 2010

References