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Calciphylaxis Without Renal Failure

Calciphylaxis Without Renal Failure Abstract Khafif et al1 and Selye2 describe calciphylaxis as an acute local calcification affecting several organ systems, including the skin, kidney, and, less commonly, the lung, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. Cutaneous lesions characteristically begin as tender, violaceous, livedoid discolorations on the proximal aspect of the extremities and on the lower part of the abdomen. The lesions become indurated plaques and nodules that progress to necrotic deep ulcerations with eschar formation. Microscopic assessment reveals calcium deposition in the small and intermediate dermal vasculature with resultant epidermal ischemia and necrosis. While the pathogenesis is uncertain, the majority of cases of calciphylaxis have occurred in patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report on a rare presentation of calciphylaxis in the absence of renal failure. Report of a Case. A 58-year-old white woman with alcoholic cirrhosis was admitted for management of ascites and skin ulcers and evaluation of a hepatic References 1. Khafif RA, DeLima C, Silverberg A, Frankel R. Calciphylaxis and systemic calcinosis: a collective review . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:956-959.Crossref 2. Selye H. Calciphylaxis . Chicago, Ill: University of Chicago Press; 1962. 3. Selye H, Gobbiani G, Strebel R. Sensitization to calciphylaxis by endogenous parathyroid hormone . Endocrinology . 1962;71:554-558.Crossref 4. Fox R, Banowsky L, Cruz A. Post-renal transplant calciphylaxis: successful treatment with parathyroidectomy . J Urol. 1983;129:362-363. 5. Bein M, Lee D, Mink J, Pickmeyer J. Unusual case of metastatic pulmonary calcification . Am J Rheum. 1979;132:812-816. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Calciphylaxis Without Renal Failure

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 132 (7) – Jul 1, 1996

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1996.03890310129026
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Khafif et al1 and Selye2 describe calciphylaxis as an acute local calcification affecting several organ systems, including the skin, kidney, and, less commonly, the lung, heart, and gastrointestinal tract. Cutaneous lesions characteristically begin as tender, violaceous, livedoid discolorations on the proximal aspect of the extremities and on the lower part of the abdomen. The lesions become indurated plaques and nodules that progress to necrotic deep ulcerations with eschar formation. Microscopic assessment reveals calcium deposition in the small and intermediate dermal vasculature with resultant epidermal ischemia and necrosis. While the pathogenesis is uncertain, the majority of cases of calciphylaxis have occurred in patients with chronic renal failure and secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report on a rare presentation of calciphylaxis in the absence of renal failure. Report of a Case. A 58-year-old white woman with alcoholic cirrhosis was admitted for management of ascites and skin ulcers and evaluation of a hepatic References 1. Khafif RA, DeLima C, Silverberg A, Frankel R. Calciphylaxis and systemic calcinosis: a collective review . Arch Intern Med. 1990;150:956-959.Crossref 2. Selye H. Calciphylaxis . Chicago, Ill: University of Chicago Press; 1962. 3. Selye H, Gobbiani G, Strebel R. Sensitization to calciphylaxis by endogenous parathyroid hormone . Endocrinology . 1962;71:554-558.Crossref 4. Fox R, Banowsky L, Cruz A. Post-renal transplant calciphylaxis: successful treatment with parathyroidectomy . J Urol. 1983;129:362-363. 5. Bein M, Lee D, Mink J, Pickmeyer J. Unusual case of metastatic pulmonary calcification . Am J Rheum. 1979;132:812-816.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1996

References