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CALCIFIED CERVICAL NODE MASQUERADING AS FOREIGN BODY

CALCIFIED CERVICAL NODE MASQUERADING AS FOREIGN BODY This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract A CALCIFIED cervical lymph node is a frequent enough finding that a roentgenologist, seeing one on a film of the neck, may seem surprised that an otolaryngologist does not recognize it immediately. However, it seems that one may confuse it with a foreign body in the trachea or the esophagus, and it may be of value to report a case to bring this entity to general attention. REPORT OF A CASE On Dec. 4, 1950, P. B., a 51-year-old white man, who gave a history of having eaten pork that afternoon and having swallowed a bone, was examined. An anteroposterior roentgenogram taken at that time showed an object which appeared to be a bone. Examination otherwise showed abnormal findings. He was admitted to the hospital on Dec. 5, and an esophagoscopy was done. In the cricopharyngeal region, a whitish area was seen and an attempt made to grasp it, but http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

CALCIFIED CERVICAL NODE MASQUERADING AS FOREIGN BODY

A.M.A. Archives of Otolaryngology , Volume 54 (5) – Nov 1, 1951

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1951 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6894
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1951.03750110086013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract A CALCIFIED cervical lymph node is a frequent enough finding that a roentgenologist, seeing one on a film of the neck, may seem surprised that an otolaryngologist does not recognize it immediately. However, it seems that one may confuse it with a foreign body in the trachea or the esophagus, and it may be of value to report a case to bring this entity to general attention. REPORT OF A CASE On Dec. 4, 1950, P. B., a 51-year-old white man, who gave a history of having eaten pork that afternoon and having swallowed a bone, was examined. An anteroposterior roentgenogram taken at that time showed an object which appeared to be a bone. Examination otherwise showed abnormal findings. He was admitted to the hospital on Dec. 5, and an esophagoscopy was done. In the cricopharyngeal region, a whitish area was seen and an attempt made to grasp it, but

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 1951

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