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BUGS

BUGS Abstract To the Editor.— We all have examined patients who believe that "bugs" are present on or in their skin; usually we find nothing to explain the symptoms. Repeated examinations in even the more plausible cases may fail to reveal any organisms. The following example of mite infestation illustrates why simple, direct examination of the skin is not adequate to exclude arthropod parasitism. Descriptions of human bird-mite infestations are not new,1-4 but because the organisms are minute and leave the host after feeding the patient may be totally unaware of the cause of his discomfort.The patient was an anxious-appearing 23-year-old housewife complaining of scalp pruritus and the sensation of bugs crawling on her face and neck of one week's duration. Examination revealed nothing significant on the skin; her fingernails were trimmed extremely closely. A potassium hydroxide preparation from scalp debris was negative. Further questioning established that the patient's husband References 1. Boyt RH: Dermanyssus and Liponyssus avium et gallinae attacking man . Brit J Derm 49:66-68, 1937.Crossref 2. Ormsby OS, Montgomery H: Diseases of the Skin , ed 8. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger, 1954. 3. Cahn MM, Shechter FR: Pruritus from an unusual source—bird mites: A report of a case . JAMA 167:724-726. 1958.Crossref 4. Reed J, Hewitt M, Barrow GI: Mite infestation . Brit Med J 4:622-623, 1969.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

BUGS

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— We all have examined patients who believe that "bugs" are present on or in their skin; usually we find nothing to explain the symptoms. Repeated examinations in even the more plausible cases may fail to reveal any organisms. The following example of mite infestation illustrates why simple, direct examination of the skin is not adequate to exclude arthropod parasitism. Descriptions of human bird-mite infestations are not new,1-4 but because the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1971 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1971.04000150109018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— We all have examined patients who believe that "bugs" are present on or in their skin; usually we find nothing to explain the symptoms. Repeated examinations in even the more plausible cases may fail to reveal any organisms. The following example of mite infestation illustrates why simple, direct examination of the skin is not adequate to exclude arthropod parasitism. Descriptions of human bird-mite infestations are not new,1-4 but because the organisms are minute and leave the host after feeding the patient may be totally unaware of the cause of his discomfort.The patient was an anxious-appearing 23-year-old housewife complaining of scalp pruritus and the sensation of bugs crawling on her face and neck of one week's duration. Examination revealed nothing significant on the skin; her fingernails were trimmed extremely closely. A potassium hydroxide preparation from scalp debris was negative. Further questioning established that the patient's husband References 1. Boyt RH: Dermanyssus and Liponyssus avium et gallinae attacking man . Brit J Derm 49:66-68, 1937.Crossref 2. Ormsby OS, Montgomery H: Diseases of the Skin , ed 8. Philadelphia, Lea and Febiger, 1954. 3. Cahn MM, Shechter FR: Pruritus from an unusual source—bird mites: A report of a case . JAMA 167:724-726. 1958.Crossref 4. Reed J, Hewitt M, Barrow GI: Mite infestation . Brit Med J 4:622-623, 1969.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1971

References