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BROMIDES IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN

BROMIDES IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN BROMIDES were the first effective treatment for epilepsy. Sir Charles Locock1 reported on their use in epilepsy in 1853, and for many years they were widely used. Today, however, because of the enthusiasm for the newer anticonvulsant drugs, bromides are not used very extensively. Some physicians even consider bromides to be of historical interest only. Several recent reviews on the treatment of epilepsy mentioned the past importance of bromides and then dismissed the drugs as "ineffective" and "possessing many undesirable side reactions."2 In this clinic bromides are still considered to be a valuable anticonvulsant. Since this appears to be contrary to the prevailing opinion, it seems worth while to report our experience with the use of bromides in the treatment of epilepsy in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS Selection of Patients.—A total of 196 epileptic children with severe organic brain lesions evidenced by mental retardation, hemiplegia, or other http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

BROMIDES IN THE TREATMENT OF EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050080732002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BROMIDES were the first effective treatment for epilepsy. Sir Charles Locock1 reported on their use in epilepsy in 1853, and for many years they were widely used. Today, however, because of the enthusiasm for the newer anticonvulsant drugs, bromides are not used very extensively. Some physicians even consider bromides to be of historical interest only. Several recent reviews on the treatment of epilepsy mentioned the past importance of bromides and then dismissed the drugs as "ineffective" and "possessing many undesirable side reactions."2 In this clinic bromides are still considered to be a valuable anticonvulsant. Since this appears to be contrary to the prevailing opinion, it seems worth while to report our experience with the use of bromides in the treatment of epilepsy in children. MATERIAL AND METHODS Selection of Patients.—A total of 196 epileptic children with severe organic brain lesions evidenced by mental retardation, hemiplegia, or other

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1953

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