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Brain Stem Auditory-Evoked Responses-Reply

Brain Stem Auditory-Evoked Responses-Reply Abstract In Reply.— We apologize to Dr Khurana for overlooking his previous report of recovery from suspected central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). As he points out, the localization of the lesion in his and our cases was indeed "clinically obvious," as one would hope with such a presumptive diagnosis. However, the localization of the lesion has not been clinically obvious in most of the 100 or more cases of proved CPM reported in the literature; we know of only three of these cases in which the lesion was recognized clinically.1-3 Several reports have emphasized that the localization of the lesion is not often discernible from the clinical findings, even in retrospect.4-6 There are several reasons for this: (1) the lesion may remain confined to the functionally silent area in the midline of the basis pontis where it originates, producing no signs or symptoms7; (2) with centrifugal spread of the lesion References 1. Boudin G, Labet R, Lyon G, et al: La myélinolyse centrale de la protubérance . Presse Med 71:2080-2082, 1963. 2. Paguirigan A, Lefken EB: Central pontine myelinolysis . Neurology 19:1007-1011, 1969.Crossref 3. Wiederholt WC, Kobayashi RM, Stockard JJ, et al: Central pontine myelinolysis. A clinical reappraisal . Arch Neurol 34:220-223, 1977.Crossref 4. Goebel HH, Herman-Ben Zur P: Central pontine myelinolysis: A clinical and pathological study of ten cases . Brain 95:495-504, 1972.Crossref 5. Cadman TE, Rorke LB: Central pontine myelinolysis in childhood and adolescence . Arch Dis Child 44:342-350, 1969.Crossref 6. Chason JL, Landers JW, Gonzalez JE: Central pontine myelinolysis . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 27:317-325, 1964.Crossref 7. Adams RD, Victor M, Mancall EL: Central pontine myelinolysis: A hitherto undescribed disease occurring in alcoholic and malnourished patients . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 81:154-172, 1959.Crossref 8. McCormick WF, Daneel CM: Central pontine myelinolysis . Arch Intern Med 119:444-478, 1967.Crossref 9. Mathieson G, Olszewski J: Central pontine myelinolysis with other cerebral changes . Neurology 10:345-354, 1960.Crossref 10. Berry K, Olszewski J: Central pontine myelinolysis . Neurology 13:531-537, 1963.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Brain Stem Auditory-Evoked Responses-Reply

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We apologize to Dr Khurana for overlooking his previous report of recovery from suspected central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). As he points out, the localization of the lesion in his and our cases was indeed "clinically obvious," as one would hope with such a presumptive diagnosis. However, the localization of the lesion has not been clinically obvious in most of the 100 or more cases of proved CPM reported in the literature; we know of only three of these...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1977.00500220084021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply.— We apologize to Dr Khurana for overlooking his previous report of recovery from suspected central pontine myelinolysis (CPM). As he points out, the localization of the lesion in his and our cases was indeed "clinically obvious," as one would hope with such a presumptive diagnosis. However, the localization of the lesion has not been clinically obvious in most of the 100 or more cases of proved CPM reported in the literature; we know of only three of these cases in which the lesion was recognized clinically.1-3 Several reports have emphasized that the localization of the lesion is not often discernible from the clinical findings, even in retrospect.4-6 There are several reasons for this: (1) the lesion may remain confined to the functionally silent area in the midline of the basis pontis where it originates, producing no signs or symptoms7; (2) with centrifugal spread of the lesion References 1. Boudin G, Labet R, Lyon G, et al: La myélinolyse centrale de la protubérance . Presse Med 71:2080-2082, 1963. 2. Paguirigan A, Lefken EB: Central pontine myelinolysis . Neurology 19:1007-1011, 1969.Crossref 3. Wiederholt WC, Kobayashi RM, Stockard JJ, et al: Central pontine myelinolysis. A clinical reappraisal . Arch Neurol 34:220-223, 1977.Crossref 4. Goebel HH, Herman-Ben Zur P: Central pontine myelinolysis: A clinical and pathological study of ten cases . Brain 95:495-504, 1972.Crossref 5. Cadman TE, Rorke LB: Central pontine myelinolysis in childhood and adolescence . Arch Dis Child 44:342-350, 1969.Crossref 6. Chason JL, Landers JW, Gonzalez JE: Central pontine myelinolysis . J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 27:317-325, 1964.Crossref 7. Adams RD, Victor M, Mancall EL: Central pontine myelinolysis: A hitherto undescribed disease occurring in alcoholic and malnourished patients . Arch Neurol Psychiatry 81:154-172, 1959.Crossref 8. McCormick WF, Daneel CM: Central pontine myelinolysis . Arch Intern Med 119:444-478, 1967.Crossref 9. Mathieson G, Olszewski J: Central pontine myelinolysis with other cerebral changes . Neurology 10:345-354, 1960.Crossref 10. Berry K, Olszewski J: Central pontine myelinolysis . Neurology 13:531-537, 1963.Crossref

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1977

References