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Brain Research, Violent Behavior, and the XYY Genotype: Comments on the NINDS Report

Brain Research, Violent Behavior, and the XYY Genotype: Comments on the NINDS Report Abstract To the Editor.— Recently, a select committee called by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) considered the problems of brain research and violent behavior, particularly the implications for "psychosurgery."1 Among other etiologic considerations, this committee dealt with genetic factors, in particular, the XYY genotype and its purported relationship to violence or aggressive behavior. Although the committee included a number of prominent neuroscientists, there was no recognizable expert in human cytogenetics. This may have been responsible for a number of rather sweeping generalizations concerning population cytogenetics, and several unfortunate nonsequiturs and simple factual errors in discussion of the XYY genotype, despite the charge to the participants to "document and evaluate only established facts and to avoid speculation."1 Since the report dealt primarily with issues involving "psychosurgery" and considerations involving the XYY genotype were peripheral to its main considerations, these might well be overlooked were it not References 1. Goldstein M: Brain research and violent behavior: A summary and evaluation of the status of biomedical research on brain and aggressive behavior . Arch Neurol 30:1-35, 1974.Crossref 2. Culliton BJ: Patients' rights: Harvard is site of battle over X and Y chromosomes . Science 186:715-717, 1974.Crossref 3. Hook EB: Behavioral implications of the human XYY genotype . Science 179:139-150, 1973.Crossref 4. Hook EB: Racial differences in the prevalence rates of males with sex chromosome abnormalities (XYY, XXY) in security settings . Am J Hum Genet 26:504-511, 1974. 5. Report on the XYY Chromosomal Abnormality. Public Health Service Publication No. 2103, 1970. 6. Engel E: The making of an XYY . Am J Ment Defic 77:123-127, 1972. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Brain Research, Violent Behavior, and the XYY Genotype: Comments on the NINDS Report

Archives of Neurology , Volume 33 (4) – Apr 1, 1976

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1976.00500040089020
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Recently, a select committee called by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (NINDS) considered the problems of brain research and violent behavior, particularly the implications for "psychosurgery."1 Among other etiologic considerations, this committee dealt with genetic factors, in particular, the XYY genotype and its purported relationship to violence or aggressive behavior. Although the committee included a number of prominent neuroscientists, there was no recognizable expert in human cytogenetics. This may have been responsible for a number of rather sweeping generalizations concerning population cytogenetics, and several unfortunate nonsequiturs and simple factual errors in discussion of the XYY genotype, despite the charge to the participants to "document and evaluate only established facts and to avoid speculation."1 Since the report dealt primarily with issues involving "psychosurgery" and considerations involving the XYY genotype were peripheral to its main considerations, these might well be overlooked were it not References 1. Goldstein M: Brain research and violent behavior: A summary and evaluation of the status of biomedical research on brain and aggressive behavior . Arch Neurol 30:1-35, 1974.Crossref 2. Culliton BJ: Patients' rights: Harvard is site of battle over X and Y chromosomes . Science 186:715-717, 1974.Crossref 3. Hook EB: Behavioral implications of the human XYY genotype . Science 179:139-150, 1973.Crossref 4. Hook EB: Racial differences in the prevalence rates of males with sex chromosome abnormalities (XYY, XXY) in security settings . Am J Hum Genet 26:504-511, 1974. 5. Report on the XYY Chromosomal Abnormality. Public Health Service Publication No. 2103, 1970. 6. Engel E: The making of an XYY . Am J Ment Defic 77:123-127, 1972.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1976

References