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Boston Dermatological Society

Boston Dermatological Society THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII JULY, 1909 NO. 7 November, 1908. DR. GEORGE T. HARDING in the chair. Paraffine Prosthesis. Adverse Effect of. Presented by DR. J. C. WHITE. For the removal of wrinkles of the forehead, a young woman consulted an advertising medical company. To accomplish their removal injection of paraffine was recommended as a safe and effectual procedure. Soon after the injection of the paraffine, however, much of it gravitated down the sides of the nose into the subcutaneous tissue of the cheeks. In an attempt to remove the disastrous effects of the paraffine the same medical company further aggravated the condition by making a perpendicular incision, two inches in length, over the mid-frontal region. On healing, this incision, which was devoid of any benefit, left a depressed puckered circatrix [sic], greatly augmenting the unfortunate disfiguration. The patient was a well-developed young woman with naturally comely features. The skin of the middle third of the frontal region was thickened, reddened and glossy, giving somewhat the impression of scleroderma, with a depressed puckered scar in the median, two inches in length. The shape of the nose was much distorted by thickening of its lateral surfaces. On the cheeks the skin was in a similar condition to that of the forehead, except that the subcutaneous thickening was nodular in character, producing a corresponding irregularity of the cutaneous surface. Under discussion the patient's condition was deplored and the procedure unanimously condemned. Dr. Burns said that this patient had sought relief from her deformity at the Massachusetts General Hospital last summer, where she remained until it was determined that the infiltration was due to organized connective tissue, which had replaced the paraffine. This observation is in accordance with several of the recent investigations relative to the fate of paraffine injected beneath the skin, viz: that the paraffine is absorbed and replaced by connective tissue. The outlook for the patient seemed hopeless. It was the consensus of opinion that nothing could be done for her relief. J Cutan Dis. 1909;27(7):313-314. So fill her up son, don't be staring . . . “Fill Her Up”—Sting, 1999 View LargeDownload http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Boston Dermatological Society

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 145 (7) – Jul 1, 2009

Boston Dermatological Society

Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII JULY, 1909 NO. 7 November, 1908. DR. GEORGE T. HARDING in the chair. Paraffine Prosthesis. Adverse Effect of. Presented by DR. J. C. WHITE. For the removal of wrinkles of the forehead, a young woman consulted an advertising medical company. To accomplish their removal injection of paraffine was recommended as a safe and effectual procedure. Soon after the injection of the paraffine, however, much of it gravitated down the sides of the nose into the...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archdermatol.2009.122
Publisher site
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Abstract

THE JOURNAL OF CUTANEOUS DISEASES VOL. XXVII JULY, 1909 NO. 7 November, 1908. DR. GEORGE T. HARDING in the chair. Paraffine Prosthesis. Adverse Effect of. Presented by DR. J. C. WHITE. For the removal of wrinkles of the forehead, a young woman consulted an advertising medical company. To accomplish their removal injection of paraffine was recommended as a safe and effectual procedure. Soon after the injection of the paraffine, however, much of it gravitated down the sides of the nose into the subcutaneous tissue of the cheeks. In an attempt to remove the disastrous effects of the paraffine the same medical company further aggravated the condition by making a perpendicular incision, two inches in length, over the mid-frontal region. On healing, this incision, which was devoid of any benefit, left a depressed puckered circatrix [sic], greatly augmenting the unfortunate disfiguration. The patient was a well-developed young woman with naturally comely features. The skin of the middle third of the frontal region was thickened, reddened and glossy, giving somewhat the impression of scleroderma, with a depressed puckered scar in the median, two inches in length. The shape of the nose was much distorted by thickening of its lateral surfaces. On the cheeks the skin was in a similar condition to that of the forehead, except that the subcutaneous thickening was nodular in character, producing a corresponding irregularity of the cutaneous surface. Under discussion the patient's condition was deplored and the procedure unanimously condemned. Dr. Burns said that this patient had sought relief from her deformity at the Massachusetts General Hospital last summer, where she remained until it was determined that the infiltration was due to organized connective tissue, which had replaced the paraffine. This observation is in accordance with several of the recent investigations relative to the fate of paraffine injected beneath the skin, viz: that the paraffine is absorbed and replaced by connective tissue. The outlook for the patient seemed hopeless. It was the consensus of opinion that nothing could be done for her relief. J Cutan Dis. 1909;27(7):313-314. So fill her up son, don't be staring . . . “Fill Her Up”—Sting, 1999 View LargeDownload

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 2009

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