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Blood Gas Changes and Hypophosphatemia in Lactate-Induced Panic

Blood Gas Changes and Hypophosphatemia in Lactate-Induced Panic Abstract To the Editor.— Gorman and associates found that 15 minutes before a lactate infusion patients with PD had a lower inorganic phosphate (PO4) level than controls. Moreover, using a cutoff point of 0.73 mmol/L (2.25 mg/dL), post hoc analysis revealed a significantly greater proportion of low baseline PO4 levels among the lactate panicker patient group than in the nonpanicker group. The authors conclude that (1) low PO4 level is associated with PD and (2) the level of PO4 before a lactate infusion may be a predictor of subsequent lactate vulnerability. Rather than to a metabolic disturbance, the authors ascribe this hypophosphatemia to the HV, which occurred both during the lactate-induced panic attack and before the infusion.In a retrospective examination of 32 patients with PD, as determined by DSM III-R,1 we failed to find any hypophosphatemia. Mean venous PO4 level was 1.18 mmol/L (3.65 mg/dL) (SD, 0.18 References 1. American Psychiatric Association, Work Group to Revise DSM-III: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , ed 3, Revised. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 1987. 2. Griez E, Pols HJ, van den Hout MA: Acid base balance in real life panic . J Affective Disord 1987;12:263-266.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of General Psychiatry American Medical Association

Blood Gas Changes and Hypophosphatemia in Lactate-Induced Panic

Archives of General Psychiatry , Volume 45 (1) – Jan 1, 1988

Blood Gas Changes and Hypophosphatemia in Lactate-Induced Panic

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Gorman and associates found that 15 minutes before a lactate infusion patients with PD had a lower inorganic phosphate (PO4) level than controls. Moreover, using a cutoff point of 0.73 mmol/L (2.25 mg/dL), post hoc analysis revealed a significantly greater proportion of low baseline PO4 levels among the lactate panicker patient group than in the nonpanicker group. The authors conclude that (1) low PO4 level is associated with PD and (2) the level of PO4 before a...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1988 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-990X
eISSN
1598-3636
DOI
10.1001/archpsyc.1988.01800250112015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— Gorman and associates found that 15 minutes before a lactate infusion patients with PD had a lower inorganic phosphate (PO4) level than controls. Moreover, using a cutoff point of 0.73 mmol/L (2.25 mg/dL), post hoc analysis revealed a significantly greater proportion of low baseline PO4 levels among the lactate panicker patient group than in the nonpanicker group. The authors conclude that (1) low PO4 level is associated with PD and (2) the level of PO4 before a lactate infusion may be a predictor of subsequent lactate vulnerability. Rather than to a metabolic disturbance, the authors ascribe this hypophosphatemia to the HV, which occurred both during the lactate-induced panic attack and before the infusion.In a retrospective examination of 32 patients with PD, as determined by DSM III-R,1 we failed to find any hypophosphatemia. Mean venous PO4 level was 1.18 mmol/L (3.65 mg/dL) (SD, 0.18 References 1. American Psychiatric Association, Work Group to Revise DSM-III: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders , ed 3, Revised. Washington, DC, American Psychiatric Association, 1987. 2. Griez E, Pols HJ, van den Hout MA: Acid base balance in real life panic . J Affective Disord 1987;12:263-266.Crossref

Journal

Archives of General PsychiatryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1988

References