Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

BLOOD FIBRIN CHANGES IN VARIOUS DISEASES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DISEASE OF THE LIVER

BLOOD FIBRIN CHANGES IN VARIOUS DISEASES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DISEASE OF THE LIVER Abstract Foster and Whipple1 have devised a relatively simple method for the clinical estimation of fibrinogen. In their experiments on animals, these investigators have found that fibrinogen, in direct contrast to the other blood proteins, varies widely in amount, and that the production of this labile protein is stimulated in different degrees by different diseases. Whipple concludes that the liver is the chief, if not the sole, source of fibrinogen, and finds that those diseases which stimulate or depress liver function in like manner and in equal degree stimulate or depress fibrinogen production. This suggested to us the possible clinical value of a more comprehensive knowledge of the fibrin content of the blood in disease, especially in disease of the liver, and led us to undertake a series of fibrin estimations on the blood of patients and of normal people. These first observations were reported elsewhere.2 Our fibrin studies have been References 1. Foster, D. P., and Whipple, G. H.: Am. J. Physiol. 58:365 ( (Jan.) ) 1922. 2. McLester, J. S.: Diagnostic Value of Blood Fibrin Determinations with Special Reference to Disease of the Liver , J. A. M. A. 79:17 ( (July 1) ) 1922.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

BLOOD FIBRIN CHANGES IN VARIOUS DISEASES WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO DISEASE OF THE LIVER

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/blood-fibrin-changes-in-various-diseases-with-special-reference-to-DrSKlduiT2
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0730-188X
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1925.00120080029003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Foster and Whipple1 have devised a relatively simple method for the clinical estimation of fibrinogen. In their experiments on animals, these investigators have found that fibrinogen, in direct contrast to the other blood proteins, varies widely in amount, and that the production of this labile protein is stimulated in different degrees by different diseases. Whipple concludes that the liver is the chief, if not the sole, source of fibrinogen, and finds that those diseases which stimulate or depress liver function in like manner and in equal degree stimulate or depress fibrinogen production. This suggested to us the possible clinical value of a more comprehensive knowledge of the fibrin content of the blood in disease, especially in disease of the liver, and led us to undertake a series of fibrin estimations on the blood of patients and of normal people. These first observations were reported elsewhere.2 Our fibrin studies have been References 1. Foster, D. P., and Whipple, G. H.: Am. J. Physiol. 58:365 ( (Jan.) ) 1922. 2. McLester, J. S.: Diagnostic Value of Blood Fibrin Determinations with Special Reference to Disease of the Liver , J. A. M. A. 79:17 ( (July 1) ) 1922.Crossref

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1925

References