Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

BLOOD DETERMINATION AND ESTIMATION OF BLOOD LOSS DURING SURGICAL OPERATIONS

BLOOD DETERMINATION AND ESTIMATION OF BLOOD LOSS DURING SURGICAL OPERATIONS Abstract THE CONDITION of the surgical patient postoperatively depends on several factors, among which are surgical trauma, length of operation, type of anesthesia and loss of blood. The more closely each of these factors can be maintained to normal, the more rapid will be the patient's recovery. With improved methods of surgery and anesthesia, the causes producing shock have been reduced to a minimum, with hemorrhage or blood loss as the chief remaining cause. Work was done to show that hemorrhage, too, could be controlled and measured and the lost blood replaced by adequate amounts to compensate for the original loss. This permits patients to be returned to the ward postoperatively in much better condition than those in whom no accurate replacement of blood has been made. Gatch and Little1 in 1924 observed that blood losses up to 700 cc. did not appreciably disturb the patient's postoperative course. Robust and References 1. Gatch, W. D., and Little, W. D.: Amount of Blood Lost During Some of the More Common Operations , J. A. M. A. 83:1075 ( (Oct. 4) ) 1924.Crossref 2. Coller, F. A.: Crook, C. E., and Iob, V.: Blood Loss in Surgical Operations , J. A. M. A. 126:1 ( (Sept. 2) ) 1944.Crossref 3. Blain, A.: Impressions Resulting from Three Thousand Transfusions of Unmodified Blood , Ann. Surg. 89:189, 1929.Crossref 4. Coller, F. A., and Maddock, W. G.: Dehydration Attendant on Surgical Operations , J. A. M. A. 99:875 ( (Sept. 10) ) 1932.Crossref 5. Pilcher, F., and Sheard, C.: Measurements on the Loss of Blood During Transurethral Resection and Other Surgical Procedures, Determined by Spectrophotometric and Photelometric Methods , Proc. Staff Meet., Mayo Clin. 12:213, 1937. 6. Leriche, R., and Vasilaros, E.: De la perte de sang occasionee par les diverses opérations: Contribution à l'étude de la maladie postopératoire , Mém. Acad. de chir. 65:1242, 1939. 7. Wangensteen, O. H.: Controlled Administration of Fluid to the Surgical Patient , Minnesota Med. 25:783, 1942. 8. Sanford, A. H.; Sheard, C., and Osterberg, A. E.: The Photelometer and Its Use in the Clinical Laboratory , Am. J. Clin. Path. 3:405, 1933. 9. Nesbitt, R. M., and Longer, K. K.; Studies of Blood Loss During Transurethral Resections , J. Urol. 46:713, 1941. 10. White, M. L., and Buxton, R. W.: Blood Loss in Thoracic Operations , J. Thoracic Surg. 12:198, 1942. 11. White, J. C.; Whitlaw, G. P.; Sweet, W. H., and Hurwill, E. S.: Blood Loss During Neurosurgical Operations , Ann. Surg. 107:287, 1938.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

BLOOD DETERMINATION AND ESTIMATION OF BLOOD LOSS DURING SURGICAL OPERATIONS

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/blood-determination-and-estimation-of-blood-loss-during-surgical-WT0lVg2m5Z
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1948 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1948.01240020441015
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE CONDITION of the surgical patient postoperatively depends on several factors, among which are surgical trauma, length of operation, type of anesthesia and loss of blood. The more closely each of these factors can be maintained to normal, the more rapid will be the patient's recovery. With improved methods of surgery and anesthesia, the causes producing shock have been reduced to a minimum, with hemorrhage or blood loss as the chief remaining cause. Work was done to show that hemorrhage, too, could be controlled and measured and the lost blood replaced by adequate amounts to compensate for the original loss. This permits patients to be returned to the ward postoperatively in much better condition than those in whom no accurate replacement of blood has been made. Gatch and Little1 in 1924 observed that blood losses up to 700 cc. did not appreciably disturb the patient's postoperative course. Robust and References 1. Gatch, W. D., and Little, W. D.: Amount of Blood Lost During Some of the More Common Operations , J. A. M. A. 83:1075 ( (Oct. 4) ) 1924.Crossref 2. Coller, F. A.: Crook, C. E., and Iob, V.: Blood Loss in Surgical Operations , J. A. M. A. 126:1 ( (Sept. 2) ) 1944.Crossref 3. Blain, A.: Impressions Resulting from Three Thousand Transfusions of Unmodified Blood , Ann. Surg. 89:189, 1929.Crossref 4. Coller, F. A., and Maddock, W. G.: Dehydration Attendant on Surgical Operations , J. A. M. A. 99:875 ( (Sept. 10) ) 1932.Crossref 5. Pilcher, F., and Sheard, C.: Measurements on the Loss of Blood During Transurethral Resection and Other Surgical Procedures, Determined by Spectrophotometric and Photelometric Methods , Proc. Staff Meet., Mayo Clin. 12:213, 1937. 6. Leriche, R., and Vasilaros, E.: De la perte de sang occasionee par les diverses opérations: Contribution à l'étude de la maladie postopératoire , Mém. Acad. de chir. 65:1242, 1939. 7. Wangensteen, O. H.: Controlled Administration of Fluid to the Surgical Patient , Minnesota Med. 25:783, 1942. 8. Sanford, A. H.; Sheard, C., and Osterberg, A. E.: The Photelometer and Its Use in the Clinical Laboratory , Am. J. Clin. Path. 3:405, 1933. 9. Nesbitt, R. M., and Longer, K. K.; Studies of Blood Loss During Transurethral Resections , J. Urol. 46:713, 1941. 10. White, M. L., and Buxton, R. W.: Blood Loss in Thoracic Operations , J. Thoracic Surg. 12:198, 1942. 11. White, J. C.; Whitlaw, G. P.; Sweet, W. H., and Hurwill, E. S.: Blood Loss During Neurosurgical Operations , Ann. Surg. 107:287, 1938.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1948

References