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BLINDNESS AND PAPILLEDEMA IN GUERNSEY CALVES: A SECOND COMMUNICATION

BLINDNESS AND PAPILLEDEMA IN GUERNSEY CALVES: A SECOND COMMUNICATION Abstract In a previous communication1 about blindness in Guernsey calves, one of us (the senior author) reviewed the literature of this subject, discussed the clinical symptoms of the disorder and recorded the results of an investigation of its pathologic histology. The chief facts and observations developed by this study, briefly summarized, are as follows : A disease which may be regarded as a clinical entity, well known to veterinarians and others concerned with the care of cattle, but to which comparatively few publications have been devoted, apparently first carefully described from the general and pathologic standpoints thirty years ago by Nettleship and Hudson, characterized by complete blindness and papilledema (choked disk) and practically unassociated with other symptoms, exists among calves (male and female), usually, if not exclusively, of the Guernsey breed, and is generally detected within the first year of life, but may be present at birth. The important pathologic References 1. de Schweinitz, G. E.: Blindness and Papilledema in Guernsey Calves, Usually Bulls , Arch. Ophth. 7:1 ( (Jan.) ) 1932Crossref 2. Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 29:321, 1931. 3. Crocker, W. T.: Cornell Veterinarian 9:171, 1929. 4. Nettleship, E., and Hudson, A. C. : Roy. London Ophth. Hosp. Rep. 19: 14, 1913. 5. Clark, J. S. : Personal communication to Dr. Dick. 6. MacCallan, A. F., and Mann, Ida: Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 46:229, 1926. 7. Summers, T. C.: Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 47:221, 1927. 8. Porter, L. B.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Mann, Ida: The Development of the Human Eye , Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1928, p. 140. 10. The suggestion that failure of development of medullary fibers should be considered comes from Dr. Jonas Friedenwald. 11. Delez ( J. Am. Vet. A. 74:222, 1929) 12. Dr. Verhoeff, in this connection, has also stated: "the possibility, however, that the papilledema was due to a pre-existent slight inflammation of the nerve with marked edema, is not positively excluded." 13. It is proper to state that Dr. Verhoeff, after his examination of the slides from the brain of the bull calf described in the former communication, declared that he was unconvinced that an actual edema was present. He has not had the opportunity of studying the slides from the brain of the female calf. 14. Clark, J. S. : Personal communication to Dean Dick of the veterinary department of the University of Pennsylvania. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

BLINDNESS AND PAPILLEDEMA IN GUERNSEY CALVES: A SECOND COMMUNICATION

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1934 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1934.00830080202022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In a previous communication1 about blindness in Guernsey calves, one of us (the senior author) reviewed the literature of this subject, discussed the clinical symptoms of the disorder and recorded the results of an investigation of its pathologic histology. The chief facts and observations developed by this study, briefly summarized, are as follows : A disease which may be regarded as a clinical entity, well known to veterinarians and others concerned with the care of cattle, but to which comparatively few publications have been devoted, apparently first carefully described from the general and pathologic standpoints thirty years ago by Nettleship and Hudson, characterized by complete blindness and papilledema (choked disk) and practically unassociated with other symptoms, exists among calves (male and female), usually, if not exclusively, of the Guernsey breed, and is generally detected within the first year of life, but may be present at birth. The important pathologic References 1. de Schweinitz, G. E.: Blindness and Papilledema in Guernsey Calves, Usually Bulls , Arch. Ophth. 7:1 ( (Jan.) ) 1932Crossref 2. Tr. Am. Ophth. Soc. 29:321, 1931. 3. Crocker, W. T.: Cornell Veterinarian 9:171, 1929. 4. Nettleship, E., and Hudson, A. C. : Roy. London Ophth. Hosp. Rep. 19: 14, 1913. 5. Clark, J. S. : Personal communication to Dr. Dick. 6. MacCallan, A. F., and Mann, Ida: Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 46:229, 1926. 7. Summers, T. C.: Tr. Ophth. Soc. U. Kingdom 47:221, 1927. 8. Porter, L. B.: Personal communication to the authors. 9. Mann, Ida: The Development of the Human Eye , Cambridge, Mass., Harvard University Press, 1928, p. 140. 10. The suggestion that failure of development of medullary fibers should be considered comes from Dr. Jonas Friedenwald. 11. Delez ( J. Am. Vet. A. 74:222, 1929) 12. Dr. Verhoeff, in this connection, has also stated: "the possibility, however, that the papilledema was due to a pre-existent slight inflammation of the nerve with marked edema, is not positively excluded." 13. It is proper to state that Dr. Verhoeff, after his examination of the slides from the brain of the bull calf described in the former communication, declared that he was unconvinced that an actual edema was present. He has not had the opportunity of studying the slides from the brain of the female calf. 14. Clark, J. S. : Personal communication to Dean Dick of the veterinary department of the University of Pennsylvania.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1934

References