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BIZARRE INTOXICATIONS

BIZARRE INTOXICATIONS To the Editor:— In The Journal, Nov. 7, page 1342, Green's paper on nutmeg poisoning is timely, in that, along with plastic "glue glugling" and gasoline sniffing, Myristica fragrans is being used by teenagers and perhaps even smaller fry as the means for achieving intoxication inexpensively. The taking of nutmeg mixed with water, an old practice among narcotics addicts, was reported in Today's Health, October, 1959, page 78, and on one occasion I saw some teen-agers "spike" their beer with it. Although I have had no nutmeg addicts as patients, I have seen about every other kind. Of special interest at the moment is a 6-year-old child, who was brought to my office recently so inebriated he could not stand. His mother said that he had been addicted to sniffing gasoline for 18 months. I would appreciate hearing from other physicians who have seen similar patients. The inhalation of gasoline http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

BIZARRE INTOXICATIONS

JAMA , Volume 171 (17) – Dec 26, 1959

BIZARRE INTOXICATIONS

Abstract



To the Editor:—
In The Journal, Nov. 7, page 1342, Green's paper on nutmeg poisoning is timely, in that, along with plastic "glue glugling" and gasoline sniffing, Myristica fragrans is being used by teenagers and perhaps even smaller fry as the means for achieving intoxication inexpensively. The taking of nutmeg mixed with water, an old practice among narcotics addicts, was reported in Today's Health, October, 1959, page 78, and on one...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1959 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1959.03010350077019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor:— In The Journal, Nov. 7, page 1342, Green's paper on nutmeg poisoning is timely, in that, along with plastic "glue glugling" and gasoline sniffing, Myristica fragrans is being used by teenagers and perhaps even smaller fry as the means for achieving intoxication inexpensively. The taking of nutmeg mixed with water, an old practice among narcotics addicts, was reported in Today's Health, October, 1959, page 78, and on one occasion I saw some teen-agers "spike" their beer with it. Although I have had no nutmeg addicts as patients, I have seen about every other kind. Of special interest at the moment is a 6-year-old child, who was brought to my office recently so inebriated he could not stand. His mother said that he had been addicted to sniffing gasoline for 18 months. I would appreciate hearing from other physicians who have seen similar patients. The inhalation of gasoline

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 26, 1959

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