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Bits of Bicentennial Dermatology

Bits of Bicentennial Dermatology Abstract To the Editor.— With all the current popularity of exhibits of colonial medicine as part of Bicentennial reviews, it is of interest to add some bits of dermatology.First, Indian medicine; the chief dermatological problem was, of course, the epidemics of smallpox acquired from the white man.1 Many of the herbs used by the Indians were later incorporated into the pharmacopeia.2 Boils and superficial wounds were treated with the roots of the tobacco plant. Rothman, many years later, used an infusion of tobacco for the treatment of recalcitrant pustular dermatitis of the hands. Snake root (Aristolochia serpentaria) and lion's heart (prenanthese reubincunda) were used for snake bites.2 Celandine (balsam, jewelweed, touch-me-not, snapweed, lady's earrings) that was popular with the Indians is used todayFig 1.—Rock painting, portrayal of smallpox among Indians from Colorado and Dakota, 1779-1780.Fig 2.—Probable epidermal cysts: Amos Morrow (reprinted from Goldman.5).Fig 3.—Portrait References 1. Wellmann KF: Medizinische und paramedizinische Bezuge in indianischen Felsbildern Nordamerikas . Dtsch Med Wochenschr 99:307-311, 1974.Crossref 2. Moore RG: Indian remedies . Ohio State Med J 71:661, 1975. 3. Preston RH: History of Dermatology of Cincinnati . Read before the Central States Dermatological Association, May 10, 1969 . 4. Bell WJ Jr: The Colonial Physician and Other Essays . New York, Science History Publication, 1975. 5. Goldman L: Scalp lesions in early American art . NY State J Med 72:222, 1972. 6. Goldman L: Dermatology of Daniel Drake . Int J Dermatol 14:676-687, 1975.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Bits of Bicentennial Dermatology

Archives of Dermatology , Volume 113 (7) – Jul 1, 1977

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1977.01640070118029
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract To the Editor.— With all the current popularity of exhibits of colonial medicine as part of Bicentennial reviews, it is of interest to add some bits of dermatology.First, Indian medicine; the chief dermatological problem was, of course, the epidemics of smallpox acquired from the white man.1 Many of the herbs used by the Indians were later incorporated into the pharmacopeia.2 Boils and superficial wounds were treated with the roots of the tobacco plant. Rothman, many years later, used an infusion of tobacco for the treatment of recalcitrant pustular dermatitis of the hands. Snake root (Aristolochia serpentaria) and lion's heart (prenanthese reubincunda) were used for snake bites.2 Celandine (balsam, jewelweed, touch-me-not, snapweed, lady's earrings) that was popular with the Indians is used todayFig 1.—Rock painting, portrayal of smallpox among Indians from Colorado and Dakota, 1779-1780.Fig 2.—Probable epidermal cysts: Amos Morrow (reprinted from Goldman.5).Fig 3.—Portrait References 1. Wellmann KF: Medizinische und paramedizinische Bezuge in indianischen Felsbildern Nordamerikas . Dtsch Med Wochenschr 99:307-311, 1974.Crossref 2. Moore RG: Indian remedies . Ohio State Med J 71:661, 1975. 3. Preston RH: History of Dermatology of Cincinnati . Read before the Central States Dermatological Association, May 10, 1969 . 4. Bell WJ Jr: The Colonial Physician and Other Essays . New York, Science History Publication, 1975. 5. Goldman L: Scalp lesions in early American art . NY State J Med 72:222, 1972. 6. Goldman L: Dermatology of Daniel Drake . Int J Dermatol 14:676-687, 1975.Crossref

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1977

References