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Bipolar Disorder and Addiction

Bipolar Disorder and Addiction Substance abuse by patients with bipolar disorder does not appear to slow their recovery, but it may indicate that patients have a more rapid cycling form of the disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A team of scientists studied 3750 patients with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder enrolled in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD), a multicenter prospective observational trial conducted from 1999 to 2005 (Ostacher MJ et al. Am J Psychiatry. 2010;167[3]:289-297). The researchers hypothesized that patients with a current or past comorbid substance use disorder would experience a longer period between a major depressive episode and recovery than would those without such comorbidity. Although they did not find an association with past or current substance abuse with a longer time to recovery, they did find that patients with past or current substance abuse were more likely to experience rapid cycling from depression to manic, hypomanic, or mixed states. Based on the findings, the authors emphasize the importance of treating bipolar patients even if they have an active substance abuse disorder. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Bipolar Disorder and Addiction

JAMA , Volume 303 (20) – May 26, 2010

Bipolar Disorder and Addiction

Abstract

Substance abuse by patients with bipolar disorder does not appear to slow their recovery, but it may indicate that patients have a more rapid cycling form of the disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A team of scientists studied 3750 patients with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder enrolled in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.645
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Substance abuse by patients with bipolar disorder does not appear to slow their recovery, but it may indicate that patients have a more rapid cycling form of the disease, according to a study funded by the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute on Drug Abuse, and the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. A team of scientists studied 3750 patients with bipolar 1 or 2 disorder enrolled in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD), a multicenter prospective observational trial conducted from 1999 to 2005 (Ostacher MJ et al. Am J Psychiatry. 2010;167[3]:289-297). The researchers hypothesized that patients with a current or past comorbid substance use disorder would experience a longer period between a major depressive episode and recovery than would those without such comorbidity. Although they did not find an association with past or current substance abuse with a longer time to recovery, they did find that patients with past or current substance abuse were more likely to experience rapid cycling from depression to manic, hypomanic, or mixed states. Based on the findings, the authors emphasize the importance of treating bipolar patients even if they have an active substance abuse disorder.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 26, 2010

Keywords: bipolar disorder,addictive behavior

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