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Biosafety Concerns Involving Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to Combat Malaria and Dengue in Developing Countries

Biosafety Concerns Involving Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to Combat Malaria and Dengue in... COMMENTARY MEDICINE AND LAW Biosafety Concerns Involving Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to Combat Malaria and Dengue in Developing Countries proportion of all mosquitoes are human disease vectors, and Graciela R. Ostera, PhD wide extermination could have serious ecosystem effects. Lawrence O. Gostin, JD Given the impracticality of mosquito elimination, scien- tists are making significant advances in the generation of HROUGHOUT HISTORY, MOSQUITOES HAVE BEEN DIS- genetically modified mosquitoes that are unable to trans- ease vectors in human settlements in every region. mit disease. Proponents speculate that genetically modi- Today, mosquito-transmitted diseases are present fied mosquitoes would cause minimal ecological disrup- Tmainly in the equatorial belt, posing major risks to tion because targeted mosquito species would still occupy half the world’s population and causing disease in 700 mil- their ecological niche, simultaneously preventing the inva- lion individuals annually. Malaria and dengue are the most sive displacement by other species. prevalent mosquito-borne infections, but West Nile virus Elucidation of the full-length genomic sequences of Anoph- in the Americas and chikungunya and Japanese encephali- eles gambiae (the primary vector for malaria in Africa) in tis in Asia and Oceania are rapidly emerging. Typical areas 2002 and Aedes aegypti in 2007 provided the basic http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Biosafety Concerns Involving Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to Combat Malaria and Dengue in Developing Countries

JAMA , Volume 305 (9) – Mar 2, 2011

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2011 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2011.246
pmid
21364141
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

COMMENTARY MEDICINE AND LAW Biosafety Concerns Involving Genetically Modified Mosquitoes to Combat Malaria and Dengue in Developing Countries proportion of all mosquitoes are human disease vectors, and Graciela R. Ostera, PhD wide extermination could have serious ecosystem effects. Lawrence O. Gostin, JD Given the impracticality of mosquito elimination, scien- tists are making significant advances in the generation of HROUGHOUT HISTORY, MOSQUITOES HAVE BEEN DIS- genetically modified mosquitoes that are unable to trans- ease vectors in human settlements in every region. mit disease. Proponents speculate that genetically modi- Today, mosquito-transmitted diseases are present fied mosquitoes would cause minimal ecological disrup- Tmainly in the equatorial belt, posing major risks to tion because targeted mosquito species would still occupy half the world’s population and causing disease in 700 mil- their ecological niche, simultaneously preventing the inva- lion individuals annually. Malaria and dengue are the most sive displacement by other species. prevalent mosquito-borne infections, but West Nile virus Elucidation of the full-length genomic sequences of Anoph- in the Americas and chikungunya and Japanese encephali- eles gambiae (the primary vector for malaria in Africa) in tis in Asia and Oceania are rapidly emerging. Typical areas 2002 and Aedes aegypti in 2007 provided the basic

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 2, 2011

References