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Biological Embedding of Early Life Adversity

Biological Embedding of Early Life Adversity Opinion Editorial Rahbar and colleagues report an incidence rate for both fever to delaying vaccination across a population of children with- and seizure during the control period, or time outside of the out any clear benefit. postvaccination risk window, that was the same as baseline risk Will these results change current recommendations or help in the population. This point highlights the third implication, a pediatrician who is responding to a request to delay measles, considering what impact these data regarding risk may have mumps, and rubella vaccination? The increased frequency of on recommendation practices. Febrile seizures occur fre- “alternative” schedules also suggests a degree of acceptabil- quently among young children at a rate of 10 to 20 cases per ity among some physicians likely driven by multiple factors 1000 person-years or 2 to 4 in 100 children younger than 5 years. including knowledge of vaccinology, experience with vaccine- Any pediatrician who sees five hundred 12- to 23-month-olds preventable disease, or attitudes and beliefs regarding vacci- in a year will see at least 10 episodes with or without vaccina- nation. Previous studies have indicated that even though pe- tion. The data presented in this study show 4 to 9 excess http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Biological Embedding of Early Life Adversity

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 167 (12) – Dec 1, 2013

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3768
pmid
24165859
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Opinion Editorial Rahbar and colleagues report an incidence rate for both fever to delaying vaccination across a population of children with- and seizure during the control period, or time outside of the out any clear benefit. postvaccination risk window, that was the same as baseline risk Will these results change current recommendations or help in the population. This point highlights the third implication, a pediatrician who is responding to a request to delay measles, considering what impact these data regarding risk may have mumps, and rubella vaccination? The increased frequency of on recommendation practices. Febrile seizures occur fre- “alternative” schedules also suggests a degree of acceptabil- quently among young children at a rate of 10 to 20 cases per ity among some physicians likely driven by multiple factors 1000 person-years or 2 to 4 in 100 children younger than 5 years. including knowledge of vaccinology, experience with vaccine- Any pediatrician who sees five hundred 12- to 23-month-olds preventable disease, or attitudes and beliefs regarding vacci- in a year will see at least 10 episodes with or without vaccina- nation. Previous studies have indicated that even though pe- tion. The data presented in this study show 4 to 9 excess

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 2013

References