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BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: X. PREPARATION OF GLUTATHIONE FROM THE CRYSTALLINE LENS

BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: X. PREPARATION OF GLUTATHIONE FROM THE CRYSTALLINE LENS Abstract The energy arising in the animal body is mainly the result of oxidative processes. Oxidation in the tissues is carried by two mechanisms: the addition of oxygen to a substance and the withdrawal of hydrogen from it. According to Duke-Elder,1 the oxidative activity of crystalline lens is greater than that of nerve but less than that of muscle, while the oxygen tension in the aqueous is insufficient to meet the needs of the lens. According to Goldschmidt,2 the lens is dependent largely on the second method of oxidation (the removal of hydrogen from the lens). This mechanism depends on the presence of a substance that can act as a hydrogen acceptor. There are at least two such substances present in the lens (glutathione and vitamin C). The facts that glutathione is in greater concentration in this tissue than in any other and that this substance is References 1. Duke-Elder, W. Stewart: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1933, p. 479. 2. Goldschmidt, M.: Arch. f. Ophth. 113:160, 1924. 3. Adams, D. R.: Proc. Soc. Med. 98:244, 1925.Crossref 4. Bourne, M. C., and Young, L.: Biochem. J. 28:1803, 1934. 5. Bellows, J.: Biochemistry of the Lens: IX. Influence of Vitamin C and Sulfhydryls on the Production of Galactose Cataract , Arch. Ophth. , to be published. 6. Pirie, N. W.: Biochem. J. 24:51, 1930. 7. Krause, A. C.: Personal communication to the authors. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

BIOCHEMISTRY OF THE LENS: X. PREPARATION OF GLUTATHIONE FROM THE CRYSTALLINE LENS

Archives of Ophthalmology , Volume 16 (6) – Dec 1, 1936

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1936 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1936.00840240101011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract The energy arising in the animal body is mainly the result of oxidative processes. Oxidation in the tissues is carried by two mechanisms: the addition of oxygen to a substance and the withdrawal of hydrogen from it. According to Duke-Elder,1 the oxidative activity of crystalline lens is greater than that of nerve but less than that of muscle, while the oxygen tension in the aqueous is insufficient to meet the needs of the lens. According to Goldschmidt,2 the lens is dependent largely on the second method of oxidation (the removal of hydrogen from the lens). This mechanism depends on the presence of a substance that can act as a hydrogen acceptor. There are at least two such substances present in the lens (glutathione and vitamin C). The facts that glutathione is in greater concentration in this tissue than in any other and that this substance is References 1. Duke-Elder, W. Stewart: Textbook of Ophthalmology , St. Louis, C. V. Mosby Company, 1933, p. 479. 2. Goldschmidt, M.: Arch. f. Ophth. 113:160, 1924. 3. Adams, D. R.: Proc. Soc. Med. 98:244, 1925.Crossref 4. Bourne, M. C., and Young, L.: Biochem. J. 28:1803, 1934. 5. Bellows, J.: Biochemistry of the Lens: IX. Influence of Vitamin C and Sulfhydryls on the Production of Galactose Cataract , Arch. Ophth. , to be published. 6. Pirie, N. W.: Biochem. J. 24:51, 1930. 7. Krause, A. C.: Personal communication to the authors.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 1, 1936

References

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