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BILE PIGMENT METABOLISM IN DISEASES OF THE SKIN

BILE PIGMENT METABOLISM IN DISEASES OF THE SKIN Abstract This study was undertaken to test the possibility that defective hepatic function may be a factor in the production of certain dermatoses. As is well known, the liver is interposed between the gastro-intestinal tract and the general circulation, and one of its functions is to prevent toxic substances from the gastro-intestinal tract from entering the blood stream. This is accomplished, to a large extent, by detoxification, the processes of which include oxidation, reduction and conjugation. Theoretically, therefore, failure of this function of the liver might permit entry of toxic substances into the general circulation and thus lead to their deposition in the skin. That defective hepatic function may be a factor is suggested by the frequent occurrence of cutaneous lesions in cases of diabetes, a disease in which disturbances of hepatic function have been found to be common.1 A difficulty of putting the aforementioned possibility to the test of References 1. Rabinowitch, I. M.: (a) Brit. J. Exper. Path. 7:155, 1926 2. (b) 17:249 (Aug.) 1936. 3. van den Bergh, H. H., and Snapper, I.: Deutsches Arch. f. klin. Med. 111:540, 1913. 4. McNee, J. W.: Brit. M. J. 1:716, 1922Crossref 5. Quart. J. Med. 16: 390, 1923. 6. Wallace, G. B., and Diamond, J. S.: Significance of Urobilogen in Urine as Test for Liver Function, with Description of Simple Quantitative Method for Its Estimation , Arch. Int. Med. 35:698 ( (June) ) 1925.Crossref 7. Marcussen, S., and Hansen, S.: J. Biol. Chem. 36:381, 1918. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology and Syphilology American Medical Association

BILE PIGMENT METABOLISM IN DISEASES OF THE SKIN

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1937 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6029
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1937.01470230170010
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract This study was undertaken to test the possibility that defective hepatic function may be a factor in the production of certain dermatoses. As is well known, the liver is interposed between the gastro-intestinal tract and the general circulation, and one of its functions is to prevent toxic substances from the gastro-intestinal tract from entering the blood stream. This is accomplished, to a large extent, by detoxification, the processes of which include oxidation, reduction and conjugation. Theoretically, therefore, failure of this function of the liver might permit entry of toxic substances into the general circulation and thus lead to their deposition in the skin. That defective hepatic function may be a factor is suggested by the frequent occurrence of cutaneous lesions in cases of diabetes, a disease in which disturbances of hepatic function have been found to be common.1 A difficulty of putting the aforementioned possibility to the test of References 1. Rabinowitch, I. M.: (a) Brit. J. Exper. Path. 7:155, 1926 2. (b) 17:249 (Aug.) 1936. 3. van den Bergh, H. H., and Snapper, I.: Deutsches Arch. f. klin. Med. 111:540, 1913. 4. McNee, J. W.: Brit. M. J. 1:716, 1922Crossref 5. Quart. J. Med. 16: 390, 1923. 6. Wallace, G. B., and Diamond, J. S.: Significance of Urobilogen in Urine as Test for Liver Function, with Description of Simple Quantitative Method for Its Estimation , Arch. Int. Med. 35:698 ( (June) ) 1925.Crossref 7. Marcussen, S., and Hansen, S.: J. Biol. Chem. 36:381, 1918.

Journal

Archives of Dermatology and SyphilologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 1937

References