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BILE PERITONITIS IN INFANCY

BILE PERITONITIS IN INFANCY BILIARY peritonitis is an uncommon disease of childhood, usually produced by rupture of the biliary system from trauma, infection, or obstruction. Extremely rarely, it has been caused by the spontaneous rupture of a congenital defect in the biliary system. Such a case was recently encountered at the Boston City Hospital. REPORT OF A CASE A 3-week-old baby girl was admitted to the Boston City Hospital on June 17, 1949, with a brief history of pain and marked restlessness. The infant delivery had been normal in every respect, and only three days prior to admission she had been examined in a well-baby clinic and found to be in good health—weighing 10 lb. 6 oz. (4,700 gm.). The day prior to entry, the patient began crying, simultaneously drawing her legs up over the abdomen and becoming restless. During this day, she continued to take her feedings without vomiting and had a normal http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070711007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BILIARY peritonitis is an uncommon disease of childhood, usually produced by rupture of the biliary system from trauma, infection, or obstruction. Extremely rarely, it has been caused by the spontaneous rupture of a congenital defect in the biliary system. Such a case was recently encountered at the Boston City Hospital. REPORT OF A CASE A 3-week-old baby girl was admitted to the Boston City Hospital on June 17, 1949, with a brief history of pain and marked restlessness. The infant delivery had been normal in every respect, and only three days prior to admission she had been examined in a well-baby clinic and found to be in good health—weighing 10 lb. 6 oz. (4,700 gm.). The day prior to entry, the patient began crying, simultaneously drawing her legs up over the abdomen and becoming restless. During this day, she continued to take her feedings without vomiting and had a normal

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jun 1, 1953

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