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Benzodiazepine Use and Crash Risk in Older Patients

Benzodiazepine Use and Crash Risk in Older Patients To the Editor.—Dr Hemmelgarn and colleagues1studied injury rates associated with motor vehicle crashes and benzodiazepine use. Tobacco use is also associated with automobile crashes, as well as industrial accidents, poisonings, burns, occupational injuries, fire deaths, suicides, and violence.2,3 While the causal mechanism of these relationships is not currently well understood, several plausible mechanisms have been postulated by us and others.2-4This risk may stem from the cognitive or neuromuscular effects of carbon monoxide, nicotine or nicotine withdrawal, or an association with risk-taking behavior. Tobacco use could also increase the risk of cumulative trauma disorders resulting from impaired tissue-repair processes. While the mechanism is unknown, smoking is a potentially important confounder in injury research, and one that would have been helpful to assess in this study. References 1. Hemmelgarn BSuissa SHuang ABoivin J-FPinard G Benzodiazepine use and the risk of motor vehicle crash in the elderly. JAMA. 1997;27827- 31Google ScholarCrossref 2. Sacks JNelson D Smoking and injuries: an overview. Prev Med. 1994;23515- 520Google ScholarCrossref 3. Amoroso PReynolds KBarnes J et al. Tobacco and Injury: An Annotated Bibliography. Natick, Mass US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine1996;Technical note 96-1 4. Reynolds KHeckel HWitt C et al. Cigarette smoking, physical fitness, and injuries in infantry soldiers. Am J Prev Med. 1994;10145- 150Google Scholar http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Benzodiazepine Use and Crash Risk in Older Patients

JAMA , Volume 279 (2) – Jan 14, 1998

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.279.2.113
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor.—Dr Hemmelgarn and colleagues1studied injury rates associated with motor vehicle crashes and benzodiazepine use. Tobacco use is also associated with automobile crashes, as well as industrial accidents, poisonings, burns, occupational injuries, fire deaths, suicides, and violence.2,3 While the causal mechanism of these relationships is not currently well understood, several plausible mechanisms have been postulated by us and others.2-4This risk may stem from the cognitive or neuromuscular effects of carbon monoxide, nicotine or nicotine withdrawal, or an association with risk-taking behavior. Tobacco use could also increase the risk of cumulative trauma disorders resulting from impaired tissue-repair processes. While the mechanism is unknown, smoking is a potentially important confounder in injury research, and one that would have been helpful to assess in this study. References 1. Hemmelgarn BSuissa SHuang ABoivin J-FPinard G Benzodiazepine use and the risk of motor vehicle crash in the elderly. JAMA. 1997;27827- 31Google ScholarCrossref 2. Sacks JNelson D Smoking and injuries: an overview. Prev Med. 1994;23515- 520Google ScholarCrossref 3. Amoroso PReynolds KBarnes J et al. Tobacco and Injury: An Annotated Bibliography. Natick, Mass US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine1996;Technical note 96-1 4. Reynolds KHeckel HWitt C et al. Cigarette smoking, physical fitness, and injuries in infantry soldiers. Am J Prev Med. 1994;10145- 150Google Scholar

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 14, 1998

References