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Behavior-Changing Interventions for Treating Overweight or Obesity in Children Aged 6 to 11 Years

Behavior-Changing Interventions for Treating Overweight or Obesity in Children Aged 6 to 11 Years Clinical QuestionHow effective are diet, physical activity, and behavioral interventions in treating children aged 6 to 11 years with overweight or obesity? Bottom LineMulticomponent behavior-changing interventions may be beneficial in achieving small, short-term reductions in body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), body mass index z score, and weight in children aged 6 to 11 years. Adverse events, health-related quality of life, behavior change outcomes, and sociodemographics were poorly or inconsistently reported. Overall, the quality of the evidence was low or very low, with no evidence from lower-income countries. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Behavior-Changing Interventions for Treating Overweight or Obesity in Children Aged 6 to 11 Years

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 173 (4) – Apr 18, 2019

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2019 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.5494
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Clinical QuestionHow effective are diet, physical activity, and behavioral interventions in treating children aged 6 to 11 years with overweight or obesity? Bottom LineMulticomponent behavior-changing interventions may be beneficial in achieving small, short-term reductions in body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), body mass index z score, and weight in children aged 6 to 11 years. Adverse events, health-related quality of life, behavior change outcomes, and sociodemographics were poorly or inconsistently reported. Overall, the quality of the evidence was low or very low, with no evidence from lower-income countries.

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 18, 2019

References