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Bed Bugs

Bed Bugs INSECTS JAMA PATIENT PAGE The Journal of the American Medical Association ed bugs, Cimex lectularius, have been around for thousands of years. They are a human parasite (organism living in, with, or on another organism) from the insect family Cimicidae, which thrives in temperate and tropical regions worldwide. Bed B bugs are exclusively hematophagous (they feed only on blood). They are small but visible to the naked eye, wingless, yellow to reddish brown in color, oval shaped, and have prominent eyes. They can hide in the cracks and crevices of mattresses, in box springs, on the backboards of beds, and behind loose wallpaper baseboards, and they can travel in furniture, luggage, clothing, and other personal belongings. The stigma commonly associated with bed bugs is mostly unwarranted because infestation is not necessarily attributable to lack of hygiene. International travel, immigration, and resistance to insecticides have contributed to a resurgence in reports of infestations with these insects in developed countries. Bed bugs are predominantly night feeders, attracted to warm-blooded animals, including humans. There is currently no scientific evidence that these blood-sucking insects spread diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The April 1, 2009, issue of JAMA includes an article about http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Bed Bugs

Abstract

INSECTS JAMA PATIENT PAGE The Journal of the American Medical Association ed bugs, Cimex lectularius, have been around for thousands of years. They are a human parasite (organism living in, with, or on another organism) from the insect family Cimicidae, which thrives in temperate and tropical regions worldwide. Bed B bugs are exclusively hematophagous (they feed only on blood). They are small but visible to the naked eye, wingless, yellow to reddish brown in color, oval shaped, and have...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2009 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.301.13.1398
pmid
19336718
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INSECTS JAMA PATIENT PAGE The Journal of the American Medical Association ed bugs, Cimex lectularius, have been around for thousands of years. They are a human parasite (organism living in, with, or on another organism) from the insect family Cimicidae, which thrives in temperate and tropical regions worldwide. Bed B bugs are exclusively hematophagous (they feed only on blood). They are small but visible to the naked eye, wingless, yellow to reddish brown in color, oval shaped, and have prominent eyes. They can hide in the cracks and crevices of mattresses, in box springs, on the backboards of beds, and behind loose wallpaper baseboards, and they can travel in furniture, luggage, clothing, and other personal belongings. The stigma commonly associated with bed bugs is mostly unwarranted because infestation is not necessarily attributable to lack of hygiene. International travel, immigration, and resistance to insecticides have contributed to a resurgence in reports of infestations with these insects in developed countries. Bed bugs are predominantly night feeders, attracted to warm-blooded animals, including humans. There is currently no scientific evidence that these blood-sucking insects spread diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The April 1, 2009, issue of JAMA includes an article about

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 2009

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