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Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment From 1932 until 1973, more than 400 black men with syphilis were followed up without treatment in the "Tuskegee Syphilis Study" of the Public Health Service. After this study was publicized in 1972, James H. Jones, a historian, began the study of its origins and evolution, which comprises Bad Blood. Jones begins in the 19th century with evidence, drawn from their writings, of the racial prejudice that white physicians shared with society at large. In particular, white physicians maintained that promiscuity led to allegedly more prevalent and more severe syphilis in blacks. As transmissible agents of disease came to be understood, physicians began instead to regard syphilis as a disease to which all infected were equally susceptible (although many physicians continued to hold that the disease was manifest differently in whites and blacks). In the early 1930s, a philanthropic organization, the Rosenwald Fund, cooperated with the PHS in several ventures http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

JAMA , Volume 246 (22) – Dec 4, 1981

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1981.03320220077036
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

From 1932 until 1973, more than 400 black men with syphilis were followed up without treatment in the "Tuskegee Syphilis Study" of the Public Health Service. After this study was publicized in 1972, James H. Jones, a historian, began the study of its origins and evolution, which comprises Bad Blood. Jones begins in the 19th century with evidence, drawn from their writings, of the racial prejudice that white physicians shared with society at large. In particular, white physicians maintained that promiscuity led to allegedly more prevalent and more severe syphilis in blacks. As transmissible agents of disease came to be understood, physicians began instead to regard syphilis as a disease to which all infected were equally susceptible (although many physicians continued to hold that the disease was manifest differently in whites and blacks). In the early 1930s, a philanthropic organization, the Rosenwald Fund, cooperated with the PHS in several ventures

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Dec 4, 1981

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