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BACTERIOLOGY OF THE EYE: II. Role of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Infections Following Cataract Extraction

BACTERIOLOGY OF THE EYE: II. Role of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Infections Following Cataract... Abstract THE DEPARTMENT of Ophthalmology in the Medical College of Alabama in 1947 established the practice of routine preoperative cultures from the lids and conjunctivae of the eyes of patients admitted to the Thigpen-Cater Eye Hospital for cataract extraction. This afforded an opportunity to learn something about the bacterial flora of the normal eye, and because infection occurred in a few cases after cataract extraction, there was also an opportunity to study the etiologic agents of such infection. The preoperative culture findings, considered as normal flora of the eye, have been reported elsewhere.1 This paper is a report of the bacteria recovered from 11 patients with postoperative infections in a series of 1,653 cataract extractions. An attempt has been made to relate the origin of infection to the preoperative bacterial floral or to an exogenous source of infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS The technique used in preoperative culture of the lids References 1. Cason, L., and Winkler, C. H., Jr.: Bacteriology of the Eye: I. Normal Flora , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. , this issue, p. 196. 2. Callahan, A.: Effect of Sulfonamides and Antibiotics on Panophthalmitis Complicating Cataract Extraction , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 49:212, 1953.Crossref 3. Leopold, I. H.: Surgery of Ocular Trauma , A. M. A. Arch Ophth. 48:738, 1952.Crossref 4. Cooper, E.: Note on Preoperative Eye Cultures , Am. J. Ophth. 18:850, 1935. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png A.M.A. Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

BACTERIOLOGY OF THE EYE: II. Role of Gram-Negative Bacilli in Infections Following Cataract Extraction

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1954 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0096-6339
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1954.00920040202006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract THE DEPARTMENT of Ophthalmology in the Medical College of Alabama in 1947 established the practice of routine preoperative cultures from the lids and conjunctivae of the eyes of patients admitted to the Thigpen-Cater Eye Hospital for cataract extraction. This afforded an opportunity to learn something about the bacterial flora of the normal eye, and because infection occurred in a few cases after cataract extraction, there was also an opportunity to study the etiologic agents of such infection. The preoperative culture findings, considered as normal flora of the eye, have been reported elsewhere.1 This paper is a report of the bacteria recovered from 11 patients with postoperative infections in a series of 1,653 cataract extractions. An attempt has been made to relate the origin of infection to the preoperative bacterial floral or to an exogenous source of infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS The technique used in preoperative culture of the lids References 1. Cason, L., and Winkler, C. H., Jr.: Bacteriology of the Eye: I. Normal Flora , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. , this issue, p. 196. 2. Callahan, A.: Effect of Sulfonamides and Antibiotics on Panophthalmitis Complicating Cataract Extraction , A. M. A. Arch. Ophth. 49:212, 1953.Crossref 3. Leopold, I. H.: Surgery of Ocular Trauma , A. M. A. Arch Ophth. 48:738, 1952.Crossref 4. Cooper, E.: Note on Preoperative Eye Cultures , Am. J. Ophth. 18:850, 1935.

Journal

A.M.A. Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1954

References

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