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Axonal Transport and Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy-Reply

Axonal Transport and Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy-Reply Abstract In Reply. —First, we believe that optic nerve sheath decompression does improve the visual function of approximately 75% of patients with the progressive form of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. At present, we believe that optic nerve sheath decompression in some way improves the hemodynamic perfusion of the optic nerve, and possibly the optic disc.We agree that the issue of axoplasmic transport is complex and confusing. Although axoplasmic transport may not be directly responsible for visual function and neural conduction, we doubt that the physiologic processes of axoplasmic transport and impulse conduction can be segregated irrevocably in specific pathologic situations. For example, the experiments of McLeod et al1 dividing the posterior ciliary arteries of monkey eyes to produce ischemic optic neuropathy demonstrated an obstruction of axoplasmic transport at the lamina cribrosa.Finally, the need for a multicenter clinical trial depends on the acceptance or rejection by the neuro-ophthalmic References 1. McLeod D, Marshall J, Kohner EM. Role of axoplasmic transport in the pathophysiology of ischaemic disc swelling . Br J Ophthalmol . 1980;64:247-261.Crossref 2. Boghen DR, Glaser JS. Ischaemic optic neuropathy: the clinical profile and natural history . Brain . 1975;98:689-708.Crossref 3. Repka MX, Savino PJ, Schatz NJ, Sergott RC. Clinical profile and longterm implications of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy . Am J Ophthalmol . 1983;96:478-483. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Axonal Transport and Anterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy-Reply

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9950
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archopht.1991.01080070026013
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In Reply. —First, we believe that optic nerve sheath decompression does improve the visual function of approximately 75% of patients with the progressive form of nonarteritic ischemic optic neuropathy. At present, we believe that optic nerve sheath decompression in some way improves the hemodynamic perfusion of the optic nerve, and possibly the optic disc.We agree that the issue of axoplasmic transport is complex and confusing. Although axoplasmic transport may not be directly responsible for visual function and neural conduction, we doubt that the physiologic processes of axoplasmic transport and impulse conduction can be segregated irrevocably in specific pathologic situations. For example, the experiments of McLeod et al1 dividing the posterior ciliary arteries of monkey eyes to produce ischemic optic neuropathy demonstrated an obstruction of axoplasmic transport at the lamina cribrosa.Finally, the need for a multicenter clinical trial depends on the acceptance or rejection by the neuro-ophthalmic References 1. McLeod D, Marshall J, Kohner EM. Role of axoplasmic transport in the pathophysiology of ischaemic disc swelling . Br J Ophthalmol . 1980;64:247-261.Crossref 2. Boghen DR, Glaser JS. Ischaemic optic neuropathy: the clinical profile and natural history . Brain . 1975;98:689-708.Crossref 3. Repka MX, Savino PJ, Schatz NJ, Sergott RC. Clinical profile and longterm implications of anterior ischemic optic neuropathy . Am J Ophthalmol . 1983;96:478-483.

Journal

Archives of OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1991

References

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