Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

AUTOHEMAGGLUTINATION IN CHRONIC LEUKEMIA

AUTOHEMAGGLUTINATION IN CHRONIC LEUKEMIA Although autohemagglutination has been observed in animals under various conditions1 and may be induced experimentally in some of them,2 its occurrence in man is rare. The phenomenon was first noted by Reitmann3 in 1890, occurring in the blood of a patient with cirrhosis of the liver, and its probable appearance was noted by several other observers during the next two decades.4 In 1903, however, an accurate study of this reaction was begun by Landsteiner,1 which was later elaborated by Yorke5 in 1911, and by Clough and Richter6 in 1918. As a result, certain characteristic features were established. It was found that in various animals and in man in whom autohemagglutinins existed, the red blood cells would clump or gather together in masses when the separated serum and cells of shed blood were brought together under certain conditions. Among these were the following: 1. This http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

AUTOHEMAGGLUTINATION IN CHRONIC LEUKEMIA

JAMA , Volume 85 (22) – Nov 28, 1925

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/autohemagglutination-in-chronic-leukemia-jBPJw3AEVA
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1925 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1925.02670220025008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Although autohemagglutination has been observed in animals under various conditions1 and may be induced experimentally in some of them,2 its occurrence in man is rare. The phenomenon was first noted by Reitmann3 in 1890, occurring in the blood of a patient with cirrhosis of the liver, and its probable appearance was noted by several other observers during the next two decades.4 In 1903, however, an accurate study of this reaction was begun by Landsteiner,1 which was later elaborated by Yorke5 in 1911, and by Clough and Richter6 in 1918. As a result, certain characteristic features were established. It was found that in various animals and in man in whom autohemagglutinins existed, the red blood cells would clump or gather together in masses when the separated serum and cells of shed blood were brought together under certain conditions. Among these were the following: 1. This

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 28, 1925

There are no references for this article.