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AUSCULTATION IN THE PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF THE ABDOMEN

AUSCULTATION IN THE PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF THE ABDOMEN Auscultation is the least important of the methods of examining the abdomen. It can furnish, however, in certain cases, information that may be confirmatory, suggestive or definite. The sounds that can be heard are of greater variety than those audible in the thorax, but are, as a rule, more vague and unsatisfactory. The sounds may be either intrinsic, produced in the abdominal cavity, or extrinsic, heard over the abdominal cavity but produced in some other part of the body, always the thorax. The auscultation can be divided into (1) direct, produced with the ear alone; (2) indirect, with some form of stethoscope, and (3) modified, in which some additional procedure, such as percussion, stroking, the bubbling of air through a tube, or the vibration of a tuning fork, is used. It is rather difficult to classify satisfactorily the sounds heard in the abdomen. Perhaps as good a classification as any http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

AUSCULTATION IN THE PHYSICAL EXAMINATION OF THE ABDOMEN

JAMA , Volume 81 (9) – Sep 1, 1923

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1923 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1923.02650090026007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Auscultation is the least important of the methods of examining the abdomen. It can furnish, however, in certain cases, information that may be confirmatory, suggestive or definite. The sounds that can be heard are of greater variety than those audible in the thorax, but are, as a rule, more vague and unsatisfactory. The sounds may be either intrinsic, produced in the abdominal cavity, or extrinsic, heard over the abdominal cavity but produced in some other part of the body, always the thorax. The auscultation can be divided into (1) direct, produced with the ear alone; (2) indirect, with some form of stethoscope, and (3) modified, in which some additional procedure, such as percussion, stroking, the bubbling of air through a tube, or the vibration of a tuning fork, is used. It is rather difficult to classify satisfactorily the sounds heard in the abdomen. Perhaps as good a classification as any

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1923

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