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AURICULAR FLUTTER, WITH A REPORT OF TWO CASES

AURICULAR FLUTTER, WITH A REPORT OF TWO CASES Abstract In 1911 Jolly and Ritchie1 reported a case of Adams-Stokes disease which had been under observation for a period of six years and which showed in association with the complete heart-block a very rapidly beating auricle, the rate of the latter varying from time to time, but usually from 270 to 300 per minute. This condition they called auricular flutter. In adopting the term they refer to the work of McWilliams,2 who, years ago, observed that the application of a faradic current started the auricle into a rapid flutter. In his account, McWilliams stated that the contractions originated in the stimulated area and extended rhythmically and coordinately throughout the tissue. In 1909, Hertz and Goodhart3 reported a case with an auricular rate of 234 and a ventricular rate varying from 72 to 120. In this case the irregular and varying ventricular rate depended on a partial References 1. Jolly and Ritchie: Heart , 1911, ii, 177. 2. McWilliams: Jour. Physicians , 1887, viii, 296. 3. Hertz and Goodhart: Quart. Jour. Med. , 1909, ii, 213. 4. Lewis: Heart , 1912, iv, 171. 5. Ritchie: Edinburg Med. Jour. , 1912, ix, 485. 6. Hume: Quart. Jour. Med. , 1913, vi, 235. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Internal Medicine American Medical Association

AURICULAR FLUTTER, WITH A REPORT OF TWO CASES

Archives of Internal Medicine , Volume XII (4) – Oct 1, 1913

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1913 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0730-188X
DOI
10.1001/archinte.1913.00070040120008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In 1911 Jolly and Ritchie1 reported a case of Adams-Stokes disease which had been under observation for a period of six years and which showed in association with the complete heart-block a very rapidly beating auricle, the rate of the latter varying from time to time, but usually from 270 to 300 per minute. This condition they called auricular flutter. In adopting the term they refer to the work of McWilliams,2 who, years ago, observed that the application of a faradic current started the auricle into a rapid flutter. In his account, McWilliams stated that the contractions originated in the stimulated area and extended rhythmically and coordinately throughout the tissue. In 1909, Hertz and Goodhart3 reported a case with an auricular rate of 234 and a ventricular rate varying from 72 to 120. In this case the irregular and varying ventricular rate depended on a partial References 1. Jolly and Ritchie: Heart , 1911, ii, 177. 2. McWilliams: Jour. Physicians , 1887, viii, 296. 3. Hertz and Goodhart: Quart. Jour. Med. , 1909, ii, 213. 4. Lewis: Heart , 1912, iv, 171. 5. Ritchie: Edinburg Med. Jour. , 1912, ix, 485. 6. Hume: Quart. Jour. Med. , 1913, vi, 235.

Journal

Archives of Internal MedicineAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 1, 1913

References