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ATTEMPTS TO INFECT AMOEBA PROTEUS WITH POLIOMYELITIS VIRUS

ATTEMPTS TO INFECT AMOEBA PROTEUS WITH POLIOMYELITIS VIRUS KLING and associates1 suggested that micro-organisms in sewage—probably of the genus Bodo—might be carriers of poliomyelitis virus. Recently, Evans and Osterud2 reported that protozoa from pond, lake and river water failed to yield a significant increase of poliomyelitis virus when several strains of the virus were used. Six strains of Bodo, two of Monas and one each of Pleuromonas, Oikomonas, Tetrahymena and Uronema derived from sewage failed to support the growth of poliomyelitis virus to an extent which would be significant with reference to the finding of the virus in sewage.2 In our experiments, we tried to determine whether Amoeba proteus, normally found in fresh water, could be infected, and, if so, whether it could carry the virus of poliomyelitis. METHODS AND MATERIALS This experiment was initiated over two years ago with Amoeba proteus obtained from Elon College, N. C. The original material was in spring http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

ATTEMPTS TO INFECT AMOEBA PROTEUS WITH POLIOMYELITIS VIRUS

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1948 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1948.02030020018002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

KLING and associates1 suggested that micro-organisms in sewage—probably of the genus Bodo—might be carriers of poliomyelitis virus. Recently, Evans and Osterud2 reported that protozoa from pond, lake and river water failed to yield a significant increase of poliomyelitis virus when several strains of the virus were used. Six strains of Bodo, two of Monas and one each of Pleuromonas, Oikomonas, Tetrahymena and Uronema derived from sewage failed to support the growth of poliomyelitis virus to an extent which would be significant with reference to the finding of the virus in sewage.2 In our experiments, we tried to determine whether Amoeba proteus, normally found in fresh water, could be infected, and, if so, whether it could carry the virus of poliomyelitis. METHODS AND MATERIALS This experiment was initiated over two years ago with Amoeba proteus obtained from Elon College, N. C. The original material was in spring

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1948

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