Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Atlas of Interventional Pain Management

Atlas of Interventional Pain Management Edited by Steven D. Waldman 3rd ed, 702 pp (with DVD), $239 Philadelphia, PA, Elsevier, 2009 ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-9994-9 In the preface to the third edition of the Atlas of Interventional Pain Management, Steven Waldman states that his text addresses the technical needs of members of this expanding field by focusing more on the “how than why” of various pain-relieving procedures and by offering more “pictures than words.” He succeeds in accomplishing this aim. The atlas contains a plethora of figures, radiographic images, and pathological sections geared toward providing readers with a firm grasp of the anatomy involved in these procedures. Compared with the prior edition, the text now contains 20 new chapters and more than 100 additional images. It comprises 8 sections, of which 7 are divided based on anatomical region and 1 is dedicated to advanced interventional pain management techniques. Even for experienced pain medicine specialists, the book provides a wealth of information with respect to the types of pain-relieving procedures available to patients. For example, there is an excellent chapter on nerve blocks for head and facial pain syndromes. The book can likewise guide experienced pain interventionalists in performing less commonly used procedures. For instance, Waldman's text describes multiple methods of performing a celiac plexus block, a procedure that can be useful in alleviating cancer-related pain and chronic pancreatitis. For relative newcomers to the field of pain management, the text presents an exciting array of pain-relieving procedures in a succinct manner. One of the self-acknowledged weaknesses of the text is that it does not delve into the evidence regarding these procedures, nor does it cite any references for the techniques it illustrates. At times, the atlas promotes methods for which a clear consensus in the general interventional pain community has not been established. For example, the text states that “Daily cervical epidural nerve blocks with local anesthetic or steroid may be required to treat . . . acute conditions.” Because locally deposited steroids may take at least 3 days to take effect, some experts might advocate waiting longer periods before repeating the procedure.1 The atlas describes performing procedures such as lumbar medial branch blocks and hypogastric nerve plexus blocks “blind.” However, without the use of fluoroscopy to guide needle placement, the probability of accurately identifying the targets for the procedure may decrease, and the risk of complications may increase.2 One of the highlights of the packaged set is the DVD, which features 2 physicians performing higher-level interventional spinal procedures. One of the sections depicts a proceduralist displaying a spinal cord stimulator and implantation kit and explaining the process of implanting the device. The next segment features him performing the procedure, with the camera views alternating between the sterile field and the fluoroscopic images. The DVD allows the viewer to see how the proceduralist reacts to unexpected occurrences and how he conserves movements to increase speed and efficiency. The disc features several interventions such as cervical spinal procedures, thoracic vertebroplasty, and percutaneous lumbar diskectomy. Unfortunately, the video of percutaneous facet fusions listed on the title menu was not actually included. Overall, the Atlas of Interventional Pain Management is an informative text that effectively illustrates how to perform various pain-relieving procedures. It presents office-based as well as fluoroscopically guided procedures in a clear and concise fashion and illustrates the anatomical targets for each procedure and the appropriate needle trajectory used to reach each target. By itself, this book may not provide enough detail about these procedures to allow readers to perform them safely and effectively, but that is not its stated purpose. In conjunction with other texts or resources, Waldman's text can provide readers with a clearer understanding of the risks and benefits of these interventions. This valuable reference text will be useful for pain management specialists seeking to expand the breadth of procedures they perform, for relative newcomers to pain management who would like to gain a better understanding of percutaneous interventions, and for primary care clinicians who may be interested in referring patients for these types of interventions. Back to top Article Information Financial Disclosures: Dr Nampiaparampil reported previously serving on a research advisory board for Elan Pharmaceuticals. References 1. Stanczak J, Blankenbaker DG, DeSmet AA, Fine J. Efficacy of epidural injection of Kenalog and Celestone in the treatment of lower back pain. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;181(5):1255-125814573415PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Lee CJ, Kim YC, Shin JH, et al. Intravascular injection in lumbar medial branch block: a prospective evaluation of 1433 injections. Anesth Analg. 2008;106(4):1274-127818349205PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Atlas of Interventional Pain Management

JAMA , Volume 303 (5) – Feb 3, 2010

Atlas of Interventional Pain Management

Abstract

Edited by Steven D. Waldman 3rd ed, 702 pp (with DVD), $239 Philadelphia, PA, Elsevier, 2009 ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-9994-9 In the preface to the third edition of the Atlas of Interventional Pain Management, Steven Waldman states that his text addresses the technical needs of members of this expanding field by focusing more on the “how than why” of various pain-relieving procedures and by offering more “pictures than words.” He succeeds in accomplishing this aim. The atlas...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/atlas-of-interventional-pain-management-kxTfWCFk22
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2010 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2010.48
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Edited by Steven D. Waldman 3rd ed, 702 pp (with DVD), $239 Philadelphia, PA, Elsevier, 2009 ISBN-13: 978-1-4160-9994-9 In the preface to the third edition of the Atlas of Interventional Pain Management, Steven Waldman states that his text addresses the technical needs of members of this expanding field by focusing more on the “how than why” of various pain-relieving procedures and by offering more “pictures than words.” He succeeds in accomplishing this aim. The atlas contains a plethora of figures, radiographic images, and pathological sections geared toward providing readers with a firm grasp of the anatomy involved in these procedures. Compared with the prior edition, the text now contains 20 new chapters and more than 100 additional images. It comprises 8 sections, of which 7 are divided based on anatomical region and 1 is dedicated to advanced interventional pain management techniques. Even for experienced pain medicine specialists, the book provides a wealth of information with respect to the types of pain-relieving procedures available to patients. For example, there is an excellent chapter on nerve blocks for head and facial pain syndromes. The book can likewise guide experienced pain interventionalists in performing less commonly used procedures. For instance, Waldman's text describes multiple methods of performing a celiac plexus block, a procedure that can be useful in alleviating cancer-related pain and chronic pancreatitis. For relative newcomers to the field of pain management, the text presents an exciting array of pain-relieving procedures in a succinct manner. One of the self-acknowledged weaknesses of the text is that it does not delve into the evidence regarding these procedures, nor does it cite any references for the techniques it illustrates. At times, the atlas promotes methods for which a clear consensus in the general interventional pain community has not been established. For example, the text states that “Daily cervical epidural nerve blocks with local anesthetic or steroid may be required to treat . . . acute conditions.” Because locally deposited steroids may take at least 3 days to take effect, some experts might advocate waiting longer periods before repeating the procedure.1 The atlas describes performing procedures such as lumbar medial branch blocks and hypogastric nerve plexus blocks “blind.” However, without the use of fluoroscopy to guide needle placement, the probability of accurately identifying the targets for the procedure may decrease, and the risk of complications may increase.2 One of the highlights of the packaged set is the DVD, which features 2 physicians performing higher-level interventional spinal procedures. One of the sections depicts a proceduralist displaying a spinal cord stimulator and implantation kit and explaining the process of implanting the device. The next segment features him performing the procedure, with the camera views alternating between the sterile field and the fluoroscopic images. The DVD allows the viewer to see how the proceduralist reacts to unexpected occurrences and how he conserves movements to increase speed and efficiency. The disc features several interventions such as cervical spinal procedures, thoracic vertebroplasty, and percutaneous lumbar diskectomy. Unfortunately, the video of percutaneous facet fusions listed on the title menu was not actually included. Overall, the Atlas of Interventional Pain Management is an informative text that effectively illustrates how to perform various pain-relieving procedures. It presents office-based as well as fluoroscopically guided procedures in a clear and concise fashion and illustrates the anatomical targets for each procedure and the appropriate needle trajectory used to reach each target. By itself, this book may not provide enough detail about these procedures to allow readers to perform them safely and effectively, but that is not its stated purpose. In conjunction with other texts or resources, Waldman's text can provide readers with a clearer understanding of the risks and benefits of these interventions. This valuable reference text will be useful for pain management specialists seeking to expand the breadth of procedures they perform, for relative newcomers to pain management who would like to gain a better understanding of percutaneous interventions, and for primary care clinicians who may be interested in referring patients for these types of interventions. Back to top Article Information Financial Disclosures: Dr Nampiaparampil reported previously serving on a research advisory board for Elan Pharmaceuticals. References 1. Stanczak J, Blankenbaker DG, DeSmet AA, Fine J. Efficacy of epidural injection of Kenalog and Celestone in the treatment of lower back pain. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2003;181(5):1255-125814573415PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref 2. Lee CJ, Kim YC, Shin JH, et al. Intravascular injection in lumbar medial branch block: a prospective evaluation of 1433 injections. Anesth Analg. 2008;106(4):1274-127818349205PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 3, 2010

References