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Atheromatous Changes in the Human Internal Carotid Artery

Atheromatous Changes in the Human Internal Carotid Artery The significance of the condition of the internal carotid artery in geriatrics and in mental disabilities leading to paresis, blindness, aphasia, deafness, and the multiple disorders classed as "strokes" is now well recognized. But as W. J. Taylor has stated: It is unfortunate that the great majority of autopsies do not provide some of the critical information needed (regarding cranial vascular pathology). The internal carotids, the vertebral system, etc., are rarely examined. Microscopic study of temporal bone sections, procured when complete autopsies are granted, frequently yields additive and important information. The internal carotid artery takes an extensive horizontal course through the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone (Figs. 1 and 2). The vessel makes 2 right-angled turns in order to take this route. In addition, it may develop a loop as it emerges from the lacerate foramen to enter the intracranial cavity, and/or it may have a http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngolog American Medical Association

Atheromatous Changes in the Human Internal Carotid Artery

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1962 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0003-9977
eISSN
1538-361X
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1962.00740050269011
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The significance of the condition of the internal carotid artery in geriatrics and in mental disabilities leading to paresis, blindness, aphasia, deafness, and the multiple disorders classed as "strokes" is now well recognized. But as W. J. Taylor has stated: It is unfortunate that the great majority of autopsies do not provide some of the critical information needed (regarding cranial vascular pathology). The internal carotids, the vertebral system, etc., are rarely examined. Microscopic study of temporal bone sections, procured when complete autopsies are granted, frequently yields additive and important information. The internal carotid artery takes an extensive horizontal course through the apex of the petrous portion of the temporal bone (Figs. 1 and 2). The vessel makes 2 right-angled turns in order to take this route. In addition, it may develop a loop as it emerges from the lacerate foramen to enter the intracranial cavity, and/or it may have a

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1962

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