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ASYMMETRIC SPASTIC INFANTILE CEREBRAL PALSY

ASYMMETRIC SPASTIC INFANTILE CEREBRAL PALSY THE TERM "infantile spastic cerebral palsy" is generally applied to spastic motor defects, with or without athetosis, recognized at birth or soon after or developing during the early years of life, and due to abnormalities of the brain. The vast majority of these cases fall into the following etiologic categories: (1) developmental anomalies, which in a small number may be genetically determined; (2) cerebral trauma during the birth process; (3) cerebral degenerations, and (4) acquired postnatal cerebral abnormalities, mainly traumatic or infectious. The clinical picture may be rather variable, but in general can be separated into two groups: (1) the symmetric palsies, including the diplegias, which exhibit symmetric involvement on both sides of all four extremities but to a greater degree in the legs, and the paraplegias, in which the lower extremities are equally involved, and (2) the asymmetric palsies which include the hemiplegias, monoplegias, triplegias and quadriplegias. The quadriplegias http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

ASYMMETRIC SPASTIC INFANTILE CEREBRAL PALSY

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1947 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1947.02030010129001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

THE TERM "infantile spastic cerebral palsy" is generally applied to spastic motor defects, with or without athetosis, recognized at birth or soon after or developing during the early years of life, and due to abnormalities of the brain. The vast majority of these cases fall into the following etiologic categories: (1) developmental anomalies, which in a small number may be genetically determined; (2) cerebral trauma during the birth process; (3) cerebral degenerations, and (4) acquired postnatal cerebral abnormalities, mainly traumatic or infectious. The clinical picture may be rather variable, but in general can be separated into two groups: (1) the symmetric palsies, including the diplegias, which exhibit symmetric involvement on both sides of all four extremities but to a greater degree in the legs, and the paraplegias, in which the lower extremities are equally involved, and (2) the asymmetric palsies which include the hemiplegias, monoplegias, triplegias and quadriplegias. The quadriplegias

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Aug 1, 1947

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