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Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in... ARTICLE Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study Leah M. Lipsky, PhD, MHS; Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD Objective: To examine associations of television view- lated to intake of candy (1.18; 1.14-1.23) and fast food ing with eating behaviors in a representative sample of (1.14; 1.09-1.19) and skipping breakfast (1.06; 1.02- US adolescents. 1.10) after adjustment for socioeconomic factors, com- puter use, and physical activity. Television snacking was Design: Cross-sectional survey. related to increased intake of fruit (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.10), candy (1.20; 1.16-1.24), soda Setting: Public and private schools in the United States (1.15; 1.11-1.18), and fast food (1.09; 1.06-1.13), inde- during the 2009-2010 school year. pendent of television viewing. The relationships of tele- vision viewing with fruit and vegetable intake and with Participants: A total of 12 642 students in grades 5 to 10 skipping breakfast were essentially unchanged after ad- (mean [SD] age, 13.4[0.09] years; 86.5% participation). justment for television snacking; the relationships with intake of candy, soda, and fast food were moderately at- Main Exposures: Television viewing (hours per day) tenuated. Age and race/ethnicity modified relationships and snacking while watching television (days per week). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 166 (5) – May 1, 2012

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpediatrics.2011.1407
pmid
22566548
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE Associations of Television Viewing With Eating Behaviors in the 2009 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children Study Leah M. Lipsky, PhD, MHS; Ronald J. Iannotti, PhD Objective: To examine associations of television view- lated to intake of candy (1.18; 1.14-1.23) and fast food ing with eating behaviors in a representative sample of (1.14; 1.09-1.19) and skipping breakfast (1.06; 1.02- US adolescents. 1.10) after adjustment for socioeconomic factors, com- puter use, and physical activity. Television snacking was Design: Cross-sectional survey. related to increased intake of fruit (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.10), candy (1.20; 1.16-1.24), soda Setting: Public and private schools in the United States (1.15; 1.11-1.18), and fast food (1.09; 1.06-1.13), inde- during the 2009-2010 school year. pendent of television viewing. The relationships of tele- vision viewing with fruit and vegetable intake and with Participants: A total of 12 642 students in grades 5 to 10 skipping breakfast were essentially unchanged after ad- (mean [SD] age, 13.4[0.09] years; 86.5% participation). justment for television snacking; the relationships with intake of candy, soda, and fast food were moderately at- Main Exposures: Television viewing (hours per day) tenuated. Age and race/ethnicity modified relationships and snacking while watching television (days per week).

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: May 1, 2012

References