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Association of Infant Child Care With Infant Feeding Practices and Weight Gain Among US Infants

Association of Infant Child Care With Infant Feeding Practices and Weight Gain Among US Infants ARTICLE Association of Infant Child Care With Infant Feeding Practices and Weight Gain Among US Infants Juhee Kim, ScD; Karen E. Peterson, ScD Objective: To assess whether child care arrangements and 5.9 months of age, and 20.7% began at 6 months or influence infant feeding practices and weight gain among older. Infants who initiated child care at younger than 3 US infants. months were less likely to have been breastfed (odds ra- tio,0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.74) and Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data collected by the were more likely to have received early introduction of US Department of Education, National Center for Edu- solid foods (odds ratio,1.73; 95% CI, 1.43-2.04) than those cation Statistics. in parental care. Infants in part-time child care gained 175 g (95% CI, 100-250 g) more weight during 9 months Setting: A nationally representative sample of infants than those in parental care. Infants being cared for by rela- enrolled in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth tives had a lower rate of breastfeeding initiation, a higher Cohort at baseline. rate of early introduction of solid foods, and greater weight gain compared with infants receiving parental care. The Participants: A total of 8150 infants aged http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Association of Infant Child Care With Infant Feeding Practices and Weight Gain Among US Infants

JAMA Pediatrics , Volume 162 (7) – Jul 1, 2008

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2008 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.162.7.627
pmid
18606933
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ARTICLE Association of Infant Child Care With Infant Feeding Practices and Weight Gain Among US Infants Juhee Kim, ScD; Karen E. Peterson, ScD Objective: To assess whether child care arrangements and 5.9 months of age, and 20.7% began at 6 months or influence infant feeding practices and weight gain among older. Infants who initiated child care at younger than 3 US infants. months were less likely to have been breastfed (odds ra- tio,0.58; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.43-0.74) and Design: Cross-sectional analysis of data collected by the were more likely to have received early introduction of US Department of Education, National Center for Edu- solid foods (odds ratio,1.73; 95% CI, 1.43-2.04) than those cation Statistics. in parental care. Infants in part-time child care gained 175 g (95% CI, 100-250 g) more weight during 9 months Setting: A nationally representative sample of infants than those in parental care. Infants being cared for by rela- enrolled in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Birth tives had a lower rate of breastfeeding initiation, a higher Cohort at baseline. rate of early introduction of solid foods, and greater weight gain compared with infants receiving parental care. The Participants: A total of 8150 infants aged

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 2008

References