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Association of High Screen-Time Use With School-age Cognitive, Executive Function, and Behavior Outcomes in Extremely Preterm Children

Association of High Screen-Time Use With School-age Cognitive, Executive Function, and Behavior... Key PointsQuestionIs increased screen time at early school age associated with an increase in risk of developmental and behavioral problems for extremely premature infants? FindingsIn this cohort study including 414 children who had been born extremely prematurely, high screen time of 2 hours or more per day was associated with an increase in risk of cognitive, executive function, and behavioral problems at early school age among extremely premature children after adjusting for center, male sex, and gestational age, severe retinopathy of prematurity, and social determinants. The maximum number of hours of screen time reported for these children was 40.3 hours per week. MeaningThese findings suggest that a high level of screen time contributes further to an increase in risk of cognitive, executive function, and behavior outcomes at age 6 to 7 years in extremely premature children, supporting the need for health care professionals to discuss both the benefits and risks of screen time with families and share the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Pediatrics American Medical Association

Association of High Screen-Time Use With School-age Cognitive, Executive Function, and Behavior Outcomes in Extremely Preterm Children

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright 2021 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6203
eISSN
2168-6211
DOI
10.1001/jamapediatrics.2021.2041
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Key PointsQuestionIs increased screen time at early school age associated with an increase in risk of developmental and behavioral problems for extremely premature infants? FindingsIn this cohort study including 414 children who had been born extremely prematurely, high screen time of 2 hours or more per day was associated with an increase in risk of cognitive, executive function, and behavioral problems at early school age among extremely premature children after adjusting for center, male sex, and gestational age, severe retinopathy of prematurity, and social determinants. The maximum number of hours of screen time reported for these children was 40.3 hours per week. MeaningThese findings suggest that a high level of screen time contributes further to an increase in risk of cognitive, executive function, and behavior outcomes at age 6 to 7 years in extremely premature children, supporting the need for health care professionals to discuss both the benefits and risks of screen time with families and share the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations.

Journal

JAMA PediatricsAmerican Medical Association

Published: Oct 12, 2021

References