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Arterial Injury Associated With Fractures

Arterial Injury Associated With Fractures Abstract AVARYING degree of arterial damage occurs with every long-bone fracture. Injury to the nutrient and periosteal arteries, while significant in respect to fracture healing, is usually disregarded in the initial phase of fracture treatment. Interruption in the flow of blood of a large- or mediumsized vessel, on the other hand, is of prime importance in the care of a traumatized extremity. Under the impetus of World War II and the Korean War, the management of civilian arterial injuries has progressed beyond the confines of one surgical specialty. Regardless of whether such injuries are treated by a cooperative team of surgeons or with consultants, those caring for such trauma should recognize arterial injuries and have a knowledge of their treatment so that restoring normal circulation to peripheral tissue can be performed whenever possible. Deep, relatively fixed vessels are more prone to injury.1 Consequently, in areas where arteries are intimately related References 1. Gage, M.: Traumatic Aneurysms of the Peripheral Arteries: Pathology, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment , Amer J Surg 59:210-231, 1943.Crossref 2. Hughes, C.W.: Vascular Injuries in the Orthopaedic Patient , J Bone Joint Surg 40:1271-1280 ( (Dec) ) 1958. 3. Kennedy, J.C.: Complete Dislocation of the Knee Joint , J Bone Joint Surg 45:889-904 ( (July) ) 1963. 4. Kleinert, H.E.; Kasdan, M.L.; and Romero, J.L.: Small Blood Vessel Anastomosis for Salvage of Severely Injured Upper Extremity , J Bone Joint Surg 45:788-796 ( (June) ) 1963. 5. Beck, W.C.: Experiences With Pulsating Hematoma , Amer J Surg 73:580-587, 1947.Crossref 6. Ganley, O.H.; Merchant, D.J.; and Bohr, D.F.: Relationship of Toxic Filtrate of Clostridium Perfringens Type A to Pathogenesis of Clostridial Myonecrosis , J Exp Med 101:605-615 ( (June) ) 1955.Crossref 7. Bassett, F.H., III, and Houck, W.S., Jr.: False Aneurysm of the Profunda Femoris Artery After Subtrochanteric Osteotomy and Nail-Plate Fixation , J Bone Joint Surg 46:583-585 ( (April) ) 1964. 8. Smith, L.L., Foran, R., and Gaspar, M.R.: Acute Arterial Injuries of the Upper Extremity , Amer J Surg 106:114-151, 1963.Crossref 9. Houck, W.S., Jr., et al: Occlusion of the Internal Carotid Artery in the Neck Secondary to Closed Trauma to the Head and Neck: A Report of Two Cases , Ann Surg 159:219, 1964.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Arterial Injury Associated With Fractures

Archives of Surgery , Volume 92 (1) – Jan 1, 1966

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1966 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.1966.01320190015003
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract AVARYING degree of arterial damage occurs with every long-bone fracture. Injury to the nutrient and periosteal arteries, while significant in respect to fracture healing, is usually disregarded in the initial phase of fracture treatment. Interruption in the flow of blood of a large- or mediumsized vessel, on the other hand, is of prime importance in the care of a traumatized extremity. Under the impetus of World War II and the Korean War, the management of civilian arterial injuries has progressed beyond the confines of one surgical specialty. Regardless of whether such injuries are treated by a cooperative team of surgeons or with consultants, those caring for such trauma should recognize arterial injuries and have a knowledge of their treatment so that restoring normal circulation to peripheral tissue can be performed whenever possible. Deep, relatively fixed vessels are more prone to injury.1 Consequently, in areas where arteries are intimately related References 1. Gage, M.: Traumatic Aneurysms of the Peripheral Arteries: Pathology, Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis and Treatment , Amer J Surg 59:210-231, 1943.Crossref 2. Hughes, C.W.: Vascular Injuries in the Orthopaedic Patient , J Bone Joint Surg 40:1271-1280 ( (Dec) ) 1958. 3. Kennedy, J.C.: Complete Dislocation of the Knee Joint , J Bone Joint Surg 45:889-904 ( (July) ) 1963. 4. Kleinert, H.E.; Kasdan, M.L.; and Romero, J.L.: Small Blood Vessel Anastomosis for Salvage of Severely Injured Upper Extremity , J Bone Joint Surg 45:788-796 ( (June) ) 1963. 5. Beck, W.C.: Experiences With Pulsating Hematoma , Amer J Surg 73:580-587, 1947.Crossref 6. Ganley, O.H.; Merchant, D.J.; and Bohr, D.F.: Relationship of Toxic Filtrate of Clostridium Perfringens Type A to Pathogenesis of Clostridial Myonecrosis , J Exp Med 101:605-615 ( (June) ) 1955.Crossref 7. Bassett, F.H., III, and Houck, W.S., Jr.: False Aneurysm of the Profunda Femoris Artery After Subtrochanteric Osteotomy and Nail-Plate Fixation , J Bone Joint Surg 46:583-585 ( (April) ) 1964. 8. Smith, L.L., Foran, R., and Gaspar, M.R.: Acute Arterial Injuries of the Upper Extremity , Amer J Surg 106:114-151, 1963.Crossref 9. Houck, W.S., Jr., et al: Occlusion of the Internal Carotid Artery in the Neck Secondary to Closed Trauma to the Head and Neck: A Report of Two Cases , Ann Surg 159:219, 1964.Crossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 1966

References