Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Are Young Surgeons Incompetent?

Are Young Surgeons Incompetent? I am a general surgeon in a small, group private practice. I wish to relay some thoughts and concerns regarding the Archives article entitled “Are Young Surgeons Competent to Perform Alimentary Tract Surgery?” by Jay B. Prystowsky, MD.1 I graduated from a university program in 2001, passed my boards without difficulty, and was inducted as fellow of the American College of Surgeons last fall. I therefore resent any implication that I am incompetent. I understand that the article points blame toward the residency training system rather than individuals. A more appropriate title would have been “Are Residency Programs Competent to Teach Alimentary Tract Surgery?” I echo Dr Gewertz’s comment that “performance difference” would have been more appropriate. Performance difference is a very popular issue. The literature is quickly becoming replete with studies demonstrating that surgeons with less experience, age, or volume are somehow less competent. Common sense tells me the same thing without having to spend research dollars. Practice makes perfect. I have no doubt that I am just as competent as Dr Prystowsky was in his fourth year of practice. He is 10 years my senior. What was his colectomy competency 10 years ago compared with mine today? This is a more pertinent comparison. A senior surgeon is certainly more skilled compared with his or her junior. And we must be careful not to assume that the senior is more skilled technically. Surgical competency is part patient selection and part complication recognition and management. Only time teaches these things, not residency. I am greatly troubled by articles such as this one being misinterpreted and used against young surgeons. One surgical complication and the hospital peer review would have grounds to dismiss a young surgeon who is not liked by local politics. Prosecuting attorneys would have more ammunition. Credentialing of young surgeons would be curtailed by the senior surgeon on the committee. Senior surgeons would use it to market themselves to primary care physicians. This would leave younger surgeons with easy cases and no means to gain the experience required to ultimately become competent. Correspondence: Dr Herman, Premier Surgical Specialists, PC, 1701 S Boulevard East, Suite 270, Rochester Hills, MI 48307 (mherman@premiersurgicalpc.com). References 1. Prystowsky JB Are young surgeons competent to perform alimentary tract surgery? Arch Surg 2005;140495- 502PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Surgery American Medical Association

Are Young Surgeons Incompetent?

Archives of Surgery , Volume 140 (11) – Nov 1, 2005

Are Young Surgeons Incompetent?

Abstract

I am a general surgeon in a small, group private practice. I wish to relay some thoughts and concerns regarding the Archives article entitled “Are Young Surgeons Competent to Perform Alimentary Tract Surgery?” by Jay B. Prystowsky, MD.1 I graduated from a university program in 2001, passed my boards without difficulty, and was inducted as fellow of the American College of Surgeons last fall. I therefore resent any implication that I am incompetent. I understand that the article...
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/are-young-surgeons-incompetent-0VOxKeJVYJ
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0004-0010
eISSN
1538-3644
DOI
10.1001/archsurg.140.11.1130-a
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I am a general surgeon in a small, group private practice. I wish to relay some thoughts and concerns regarding the Archives article entitled “Are Young Surgeons Competent to Perform Alimentary Tract Surgery?” by Jay B. Prystowsky, MD.1 I graduated from a university program in 2001, passed my boards without difficulty, and was inducted as fellow of the American College of Surgeons last fall. I therefore resent any implication that I am incompetent. I understand that the article points blame toward the residency training system rather than individuals. A more appropriate title would have been “Are Residency Programs Competent to Teach Alimentary Tract Surgery?” I echo Dr Gewertz’s comment that “performance difference” would have been more appropriate. Performance difference is a very popular issue. The literature is quickly becoming replete with studies demonstrating that surgeons with less experience, age, or volume are somehow less competent. Common sense tells me the same thing without having to spend research dollars. Practice makes perfect. I have no doubt that I am just as competent as Dr Prystowsky was in his fourth year of practice. He is 10 years my senior. What was his colectomy competency 10 years ago compared with mine today? This is a more pertinent comparison. A senior surgeon is certainly more skilled compared with his or her junior. And we must be careful not to assume that the senior is more skilled technically. Surgical competency is part patient selection and part complication recognition and management. Only time teaches these things, not residency. I am greatly troubled by articles such as this one being misinterpreted and used against young surgeons. One surgical complication and the hospital peer review would have grounds to dismiss a young surgeon who is not liked by local politics. Prosecuting attorneys would have more ammunition. Credentialing of young surgeons would be curtailed by the senior surgeon on the committee. Senior surgeons would use it to market themselves to primary care physicians. This would leave younger surgeons with easy cases and no means to gain the experience required to ultimately become competent. Correspondence: Dr Herman, Premier Surgical Specialists, PC, 1701 S Boulevard East, Suite 270, Rochester Hills, MI 48307 (mherman@premiersurgicalpc.com). References 1. Prystowsky JB Are young surgeons competent to perform alimentary tract surgery? Arch Surg 2005;140495- 502PubMedGoogle ScholarCrossref

Journal

Archives of SurgeryAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 1, 2005

Keywords: surgeons

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month