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Are We in the Midst of a Revolution?

Are We in the Midst of a Revolution? Abstract In his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn wrote: Normal science... is predicated on the assumption that the scientific community knows what the world is like. Much of the success of the enterprise derives from the community's willingness to defend that assumption, if necessary at considerable cost. Normal science, for example, often suppresses fundamental novelties because they are necessarily subversive of its basic commitments, but... the very nature of normal research ensures that novelty shall not be suppressed for very long. Major turning points in [the] scientific development [of the physical sciences] are associated with the names of Copernicus, Newton, Lavoisier, and Einstein. Each of them necessitated the community's rejection of one time-honored scientific theory in favor of another incompatible with it. They transformed the world in which scientific work was done. Such changes, together with the controversies that almost always accompany them, are the defining characteristics of References 1. Kuhn TS: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1968. 2. Watson JB: Psychological Care of Infant and Child . New York, W W Norton & Co Inc, 1928. 3. Still GF: The History of Paediatrics . London, Oxford University Press, 1931. 4. Mata LJ: The Children of Santa María Cauqué: A Prospective Field Study of Health and Growth . Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 1978. 5. Sosa R, Kennell J, Klaus M, et al: The effect of early mother-infant contact on breastfeeding, infection and growth , in Elliott K, Fitzsimons DW (eds): Ciba Foundation Symposium 45: Breastfeeding and the Mother . Amsterdam, Elsevier Publishing Co, 1976, pp 179-193. 6. Ben Shaul DM: Notes on hand-rearing various species of mammals . Int Zoo Year Book 4:300-301, 1962.Crossref 7. Oakley A: Cross cultural practices , in Chard T, Richards M (eds): Benefits and Hazards of the New Obstetrics . Lavenham, England, Lavenham Press Ltd, 1977, pp 18-33. 8. Sosa R, Kennell J, Klaus M, Urrutia J: The effect of a supportive woman on mothering behavior and the duration and complications of labor , abstracted. Pediatr Res 13:338, 1979. 9. Kahn E, Wayburne S, Fouche M: The Baragwanath premature baby unit: An analysis of the case records of 1,000 consecutive admissions . S Afr Med J 28:453-456, 1954. 10. Tafari N, Ross SM: On the need for organized perinatal care . Ethiop Med J 11:93-100, 1973. 11. Tafari N, Sterky G: Early discharge of low birthweight infants in a developing country . Environ Child Health 20:73-76, 1974. 12. Morley D: Paediatric Priorities in the Developing World . London, Butterworth Inc, 1973. 13. Levinson DJ: Seasons of a Man's Life . New York, Alfred A Knopf Inc, 1978. 14. Vaillant GE: Adaptation to Life . Waltham, Mass, Little Brown & Co, 1977. 15. Silverman WA, Fertig JW, Berger AP: The influence of the thermal environment upon the survival of newly born premature infants . Pediatrics 22:876-886, 1958. 16. Spence J: Thousand Families in Newcastle-upon-Tyne . London, Oxford University Press, 1954. 17. Robertson J: Young Children in Hospitals . New York, Basic Books Inc Publishers, 1959. 18. James VL, Wheeler EW: The care-by-parent unit . Pediatrics 43:488-494, 1969. 19. Kennell J: Discussions With Parents of a Malformed Baby , videotape produced and distributed by Health Sciences Communication Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 1976. 20. Klaus MH, Fararoff AA: Care of the High Risk Neonate . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1979. 21. Klaus MH, Kennell JH: Maternal-Infant Bonding . St Louis, CV Mosby Co, 1976. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Are We in the Midst of a Revolution?

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1980 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1980.02130150057016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract In his book The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Thomas Kuhn wrote: Normal science... is predicated on the assumption that the scientific community knows what the world is like. Much of the success of the enterprise derives from the community's willingness to defend that assumption, if necessary at considerable cost. Normal science, for example, often suppresses fundamental novelties because they are necessarily subversive of its basic commitments, but... the very nature of normal research ensures that novelty shall not be suppressed for very long. Major turning points in [the] scientific development [of the physical sciences] are associated with the names of Copernicus, Newton, Lavoisier, and Einstein. Each of them necessitated the community's rejection of one time-honored scientific theory in favor of another incompatible with it. They transformed the world in which scientific work was done. Such changes, together with the controversies that almost always accompany them, are the defining characteristics of References 1. Kuhn TS: The Structure of Scientific Revolutions . Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1968. 2. Watson JB: Psychological Care of Infant and Child . New York, W W Norton & Co Inc, 1928. 3. Still GF: The History of Paediatrics . London, Oxford University Press, 1931. 4. Mata LJ: The Children of Santa María Cauqué: A Prospective Field Study of Health and Growth . Cambridge, Mass, MIT Press, 1978. 5. Sosa R, Kennell J, Klaus M, et al: The effect of early mother-infant contact on breastfeeding, infection and growth , in Elliott K, Fitzsimons DW (eds): Ciba Foundation Symposium 45: Breastfeeding and the Mother . Amsterdam, Elsevier Publishing Co, 1976, pp 179-193. 6. Ben Shaul DM: Notes on hand-rearing various species of mammals . Int Zoo Year Book 4:300-301, 1962.Crossref 7. Oakley A: Cross cultural practices , in Chard T, Richards M (eds): Benefits and Hazards of the New Obstetrics . Lavenham, England, Lavenham Press Ltd, 1977, pp 18-33. 8. Sosa R, Kennell J, Klaus M, Urrutia J: The effect of a supportive woman on mothering behavior and the duration and complications of labor , abstracted. Pediatr Res 13:338, 1979. 9. Kahn E, Wayburne S, Fouche M: The Baragwanath premature baby unit: An analysis of the case records of 1,000 consecutive admissions . S Afr Med J 28:453-456, 1954. 10. Tafari N, Ross SM: On the need for organized perinatal care . Ethiop Med J 11:93-100, 1973. 11. Tafari N, Sterky G: Early discharge of low birthweight infants in a developing country . Environ Child Health 20:73-76, 1974. 12. Morley D: Paediatric Priorities in the Developing World . London, Butterworth Inc, 1973. 13. Levinson DJ: Seasons of a Man's Life . New York, Alfred A Knopf Inc, 1978. 14. Vaillant GE: Adaptation to Life . Waltham, Mass, Little Brown & Co, 1977. 15. Silverman WA, Fertig JW, Berger AP: The influence of the thermal environment upon the survival of newly born premature infants . Pediatrics 22:876-886, 1958. 16. Spence J: Thousand Families in Newcastle-upon-Tyne . London, Oxford University Press, 1954. 17. Robertson J: Young Children in Hospitals . New York, Basic Books Inc Publishers, 1959. 18. James VL, Wheeler EW: The care-by-parent unit . Pediatrics 43:488-494, 1969. 19. Kennell J: Discussions With Parents of a Malformed Baby , videotape produced and distributed by Health Sciences Communication Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, 1976. 20. Klaus MH, Fararoff AA: Care of the High Risk Neonate . Philadelphia, WB Saunders Co, 1979. 21. Klaus MH, Kennell JH: Maternal-Infant Bonding . St Louis, CV Mosby Co, 1976.

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Mar 1, 1980

References

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