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Application of Binaural Beat Phenomenon With Aphasic Patients

Application of Binaural Beat Phenomenon With Aphasic Patients Abstract • We investigated whether six aphasics and six normal subjects could binaurally fuse two slightly differing frequencies of constant amplitude. The aphasics were subdivided into two groups: (1) two men who had had mild cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) during the past 15 months; (2) four men who had had severe CVAs during the last 15 months. Two tones of different frequency levels but equal in intensity were presented dichotically to the subjects at 40 dB sensation level. All subjects had normal hearing at 500 Hz (0 to 25 dB). All six normal subjects and the two aphasics who had had mild CVAs could hear the binaural beats. The four aphasics who had had severe CVAs could not hear them. A 2 × 2 design resulting from this study was compared using χ2 test with Yates correction and was found to be significantly different (P <.05). Two theories are presented to explain these findings: the "depression theory" and the "temporal time-sequencing theory." Therapeutic implications are also discussed relative to cerebral and/or brain stem involvement in the fusion of binaural stimuli. (Arch Otolaryngol 103:192-194, 1977) References 1. Moushegian G, Rupert A, Whitcomb M: Medial superior-olivary-unit response patterns to monaural and binaural clicks . J Acoust Soc Am 36:196-202, 1964.Crossref 2. Wernick JS, Starr A: Binaural interaction in the superior olivary complex of the cat: An analysis of field potentials evoked by binaural beat stimuli . J Neurophysiol 31:428-441, 1968. 3. Tobias JV: Application of a "relative" procedure to a problem in binaural beat perception . J Acoust Soc Am 35:1442-1447, 1963.Crossref 4. Perrot D, Nelson M: Limits for detection of binaural beats . J Acoust Soc Am 46:1477-1481, 1969.Crossref 5. Tobias JV: Consistency of sex differences in binaural-beat perception . Int Audiol 4:179-182, 1965.Crossref 6. Oster G: Auditory beats in the brain . Sci Am 229:93-102, 1973.Crossref 7. Rothballer AB: The effects of catecholamines on the central nervous system . Psychol Bull 11:494-547, 1959. 8. Broverman DM, Klaiber EL, Vogel W, et al: Short-term versus long-term effects of adrenal hormones on behaviors . Psychol Bull 81:672-694, 1974.Crossref 9. Klaiber EL, Broverman DM, Vogel W, et al: Rhythms in plasma MAO activity, EEG, and behavior during menstrual sycle , in Ferin M (ed): Biorhythms and Human Reproduction . New York, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 1974. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Otolaryngology American Medical Association

Application of Binaural Beat Phenomenon With Aphasic Patients

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1977 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9977
DOI
10.1001/archotol.1977.00780210048003
Publisher site
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Abstract

Abstract • We investigated whether six aphasics and six normal subjects could binaurally fuse two slightly differing frequencies of constant amplitude. The aphasics were subdivided into two groups: (1) two men who had had mild cerebrovascular accidents (CVAs) during the past 15 months; (2) four men who had had severe CVAs during the last 15 months. Two tones of different frequency levels but equal in intensity were presented dichotically to the subjects at 40 dB sensation level. All subjects had normal hearing at 500 Hz (0 to 25 dB). All six normal subjects and the two aphasics who had had mild CVAs could hear the binaural beats. The four aphasics who had had severe CVAs could not hear them. A 2 × 2 design resulting from this study was compared using χ2 test with Yates correction and was found to be significantly different (P <.05). Two theories are presented to explain these findings: the "depression theory" and the "temporal time-sequencing theory." Therapeutic implications are also discussed relative to cerebral and/or brain stem involvement in the fusion of binaural stimuli. (Arch Otolaryngol 103:192-194, 1977) References 1. Moushegian G, Rupert A, Whitcomb M: Medial superior-olivary-unit response patterns to monaural and binaural clicks . J Acoust Soc Am 36:196-202, 1964.Crossref 2. Wernick JS, Starr A: Binaural interaction in the superior olivary complex of the cat: An analysis of field potentials evoked by binaural beat stimuli . J Neurophysiol 31:428-441, 1968. 3. Tobias JV: Application of a "relative" procedure to a problem in binaural beat perception . J Acoust Soc Am 35:1442-1447, 1963.Crossref 4. Perrot D, Nelson M: Limits for detection of binaural beats . J Acoust Soc Am 46:1477-1481, 1969.Crossref 5. Tobias JV: Consistency of sex differences in binaural-beat perception . Int Audiol 4:179-182, 1965.Crossref 6. Oster G: Auditory beats in the brain . Sci Am 229:93-102, 1973.Crossref 7. Rothballer AB: The effects of catecholamines on the central nervous system . Psychol Bull 11:494-547, 1959. 8. Broverman DM, Klaiber EL, Vogel W, et al: Short-term versus long-term effects of adrenal hormones on behaviors . Psychol Bull 81:672-694, 1974.Crossref 9. Klaiber EL, Broverman DM, Vogel W, et al: Rhythms in plasma MAO activity, EEG, and behavior during menstrual sycle , in Ferin M (ed): Biorhythms and Human Reproduction . New York, John Wiley & Sons Inc, 1974.

Journal

Archives of OtolaryngologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1977

References