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Apparent Decreased Risk of Invasive Bacterial Disease After Heterologous Childhood Immunization

Apparent Decreased Risk of Invasive Bacterial Disease After Heterologous Childhood Immunization Abstract • To investigate the possibility that there might be an increased risk of heterologous invasive bacterial disease after routine childhood immunization with measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine live; diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine; and oral poliovirus vaccine live, a casecontrol study was conducted within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California pediatric population. Contrary to the premise, an apparent protective effect against invasive bacterial disease was detected after all childhood vaccinations. However, when adjustment was made for frequency of wellcare visits and day-care attendance, no significant relationship was seen between receipt of routine childhood immunizations and risk of invasive heterologous bacterial disease for any individual vaccine, although a statistically significant protective effect was detected within 1 or 3 months after the receipt of any vaccine. Since a decreased risk of invasive bacterial disease was also noted to be related to the receipt of routine well-child pediatric care, other preventive health care measures may be responsible for the apparent immunization protective effect. (AJDC. 1991;145:746-749) References 1. Black S, Shinefield H, Hiatt RA, et al. b-CAPSA 1 Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide vaccine safety . Pediatrics . 1987;79:321-325. 2. Ad Hoc Group for the Study of the Pertussis Vaccines. Placebo-controlled trial of two acellular pertussis vaccines in Sweden: protective efficacy and adverse events . Lancet . 1988;1:954-960. 3. Storsaeter J, Olin P, Berit R, et al. Mortality and morbidity from invasive bacterial infections during a clinical trial of acellular pertussis vaccines in Sweden . Pediatr Infect Dis . 1988;7:637-645.Crossref 4. Breslow NE, Day NE. Statistical Methods in Cancer Research . Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer Scientific Publications; 1980:248-279. 5. Dubos R, Schaedler R. Reversible changes in the susceptibility of mice to bacterial infections . J Exp Med . 1956;104:53-65.Crossref 6. Petralli JK, Merigan TC, Wilbur JR. Circulating interferon after measles vaccination . N Engl J Med . 1965;273:198-201.Crossref 7. Young LS, LaForce M, Head JJ, Feeley JC, Bennett JV. A simultaneous outbreak of meningococcal and influenza infections . N Engl J Med . 1972;287:5-9.Crossref http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American Journal of Diseases of Children American Medical Association

Apparent Decreased Risk of Invasive Bacterial Disease After Heterologous Childhood Immunization

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0002-922X
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1991.02160070042019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • To investigate the possibility that there might be an increased risk of heterologous invasive bacterial disease after routine childhood immunization with measles, mumps, and rubella vaccine live; diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccine; and oral poliovirus vaccine live, a casecontrol study was conducted within the Kaiser Permanente Northern California pediatric population. Contrary to the premise, an apparent protective effect against invasive bacterial disease was detected after all childhood vaccinations. However, when adjustment was made for frequency of wellcare visits and day-care attendance, no significant relationship was seen between receipt of routine childhood immunizations and risk of invasive heterologous bacterial disease for any individual vaccine, although a statistically significant protective effect was detected within 1 or 3 months after the receipt of any vaccine. Since a decreased risk of invasive bacterial disease was also noted to be related to the receipt of routine well-child pediatric care, other preventive health care measures may be responsible for the apparent immunization protective effect. (AJDC. 1991;145:746-749) References 1. Black S, Shinefield H, Hiatt RA, et al. b-CAPSA 1 Haemophilus influenzae type b capsular polysaccharide vaccine safety . Pediatrics . 1987;79:321-325. 2. Ad Hoc Group for the Study of the Pertussis Vaccines. Placebo-controlled trial of two acellular pertussis vaccines in Sweden: protective efficacy and adverse events . Lancet . 1988;1:954-960. 3. Storsaeter J, Olin P, Berit R, et al. Mortality and morbidity from invasive bacterial infections during a clinical trial of acellular pertussis vaccines in Sweden . Pediatr Infect Dis . 1988;7:637-645.Crossref 4. Breslow NE, Day NE. Statistical Methods in Cancer Research . Lyon, France: International Agency for Research on Cancer Scientific Publications; 1980:248-279. 5. Dubos R, Schaedler R. Reversible changes in the susceptibility of mice to bacterial infections . J Exp Med . 1956;104:53-65.Crossref 6. Petralli JK, Merigan TC, Wilbur JR. Circulating interferon after measles vaccination . N Engl J Med . 1965;273:198-201.Crossref 7. Young LS, LaForce M, Head JJ, Feeley JC, Bennett JV. A simultaneous outbreak of meningococcal and influenza infections . N Engl J Med . 1972;287:5-9.Crossref

Journal

American Journal of Diseases of ChildrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1991

References