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Aphasia Rehabilitation

Aphasia Rehabilitation Abstract Although formal therapy for aphasia has been recorded for almost a century,1 it was reported only sporadically for many years, almost always as individual case descriptions. During World War II, however, large numbers of young soldiers who had survived brain injury but were bereft of language came to medical attention. Centers were established to care for these patients, and treatment programs were devised.2,3 With this impetus, aphasia therapy was born and has burgeoned into a therapeutic subspecialty, an academic discipline, and a paramedical business. Although most of the originally recorded efforts in aphasia therapy were those of neurologists, the field has evolved so rapidly that most contemporary neurologists are uncomfortable in a discussion of aphasia therapy. Yet, there are many reasons for neurologists to remain active in aphasia rehabilitation; it is a complex process and guidance from a physician with knowledge of the brain is frequently needed. A References 1. Mills CK: Aphasia . Med Bull 2:23-28, Philadelphia, 1880. 2. Nielsen JM, Schutz DH, Corbin ML, et al: The treatment of traumatic aphasics of WWII at Birmingham General VA Hospital, Van Nuys, Calif . Milit Surg 10:351-364, 1948. 3. Wepman JM: Recovery From Aphasia . New York, Ronald, 1951. 4. Sarno MT, Silverman M, Sands E: Speech therapy and language recovery in severe aphasia . J Speech Hear Res 13:607-623, 1970. 5. Schuell H, Jenkins JJ, Jimenez-Pabon E: Aphasia in Adults: Diagnosis, Prognosis and Treatment . New York, Hoeber Medical Division (Harper & Row), 1964. 6. Benton AL: Behavioral Changes in Cerebrovascular Disease . New York, Harper & Row, 1970. 7. Darley FL: Treatment of acquired aphasia , in Friedlander WJ (ed): Advances in Neurology . New York, Raven Press, 1975, vol 7, pp 111-145. 8. Prognosis in aphasia , editorial. Lancet 2:24, 1977. 9. Smith A: Diagnosis, Intelligence and Rehabilitation of Chronic Aphasics: Final Report . Ann Arbor, Mich, University of Michigan Press, 1972. 10. Eisenson J: Prognostic factors related to language rehabilitation in aphasia . J Speech Hear Dis 14:262-264, 1949. 11. Wertz RT, Collins MJ, Brookshire RH, et al: The Veterans Administration cooperative study on aphasia. Presented at the 16th annual meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Chicago, 1978. 12. Skinner BF: Teaching machines . Science 128:969-977, 1958.Crossref 13. Albert ML, Sparks RW, Helm NA: Melodic intonation therapy for aphasia . Arch Neurol 29:130-131, 1973.Crossref 14. Glass AV, Gazzanga MS, Premack D: Artificial language training in global aphasias . Neuropsychologia 11:95-103, 1973.Crossref 15. Gardner H, Zurif E, Berry T, et al: Visual communication in aphasia . Neuropsychologia 14:275-292, 1976.Crossref 16. Baker E, Berry T, Gardner H, et al: Can linguistic competence be dissociated from natural language functions? Nature 2:609-619, 1976. 17. Helm N, Benson DF: Visual action therapy for global aphasia. Presented at the 16th annual meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Chicago, 1978. 18. Skelly M, Schinsky L, Smith RW, et al: American Indian sign (Amerind) as a facilitator of verbalization for the oral verbal apraxic . J Speech Hear Dis 39:445-456, 1974. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Neurology American Medical Association

Aphasia Rehabilitation

Archives of Neurology , Volume 36 (4) – Apr 1, 1979

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-9942
eISSN
1538-3687
DOI
10.1001/archneur.1979.00500400041004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Although formal therapy for aphasia has been recorded for almost a century,1 it was reported only sporadically for many years, almost always as individual case descriptions. During World War II, however, large numbers of young soldiers who had survived brain injury but were bereft of language came to medical attention. Centers were established to care for these patients, and treatment programs were devised.2,3 With this impetus, aphasia therapy was born and has burgeoned into a therapeutic subspecialty, an academic discipline, and a paramedical business. Although most of the originally recorded efforts in aphasia therapy were those of neurologists, the field has evolved so rapidly that most contemporary neurologists are uncomfortable in a discussion of aphasia therapy. Yet, there are many reasons for neurologists to remain active in aphasia rehabilitation; it is a complex process and guidance from a physician with knowledge of the brain is frequently needed. A References 1. Mills CK: Aphasia . Med Bull 2:23-28, Philadelphia, 1880. 2. Nielsen JM, Schutz DH, Corbin ML, et al: The treatment of traumatic aphasics of WWII at Birmingham General VA Hospital, Van Nuys, Calif . Milit Surg 10:351-364, 1948. 3. Wepman JM: Recovery From Aphasia . New York, Ronald, 1951. 4. Sarno MT, Silverman M, Sands E: Speech therapy and language recovery in severe aphasia . J Speech Hear Res 13:607-623, 1970. 5. Schuell H, Jenkins JJ, Jimenez-Pabon E: Aphasia in Adults: Diagnosis, Prognosis and Treatment . New York, Hoeber Medical Division (Harper & Row), 1964. 6. Benton AL: Behavioral Changes in Cerebrovascular Disease . New York, Harper & Row, 1970. 7. Darley FL: Treatment of acquired aphasia , in Friedlander WJ (ed): Advances in Neurology . New York, Raven Press, 1975, vol 7, pp 111-145. 8. Prognosis in aphasia , editorial. Lancet 2:24, 1977. 9. Smith A: Diagnosis, Intelligence and Rehabilitation of Chronic Aphasics: Final Report . Ann Arbor, Mich, University of Michigan Press, 1972. 10. Eisenson J: Prognostic factors related to language rehabilitation in aphasia . J Speech Hear Dis 14:262-264, 1949. 11. Wertz RT, Collins MJ, Brookshire RH, et al: The Veterans Administration cooperative study on aphasia. Presented at the 16th annual meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Chicago, 1978. 12. Skinner BF: Teaching machines . Science 128:969-977, 1958.Crossref 13. Albert ML, Sparks RW, Helm NA: Melodic intonation therapy for aphasia . Arch Neurol 29:130-131, 1973.Crossref 14. Glass AV, Gazzanga MS, Premack D: Artificial language training in global aphasias . Neuropsychologia 11:95-103, 1973.Crossref 15. Gardner H, Zurif E, Berry T, et al: Visual communication in aphasia . Neuropsychologia 14:275-292, 1976.Crossref 16. Baker E, Berry T, Gardner H, et al: Can linguistic competence be dissociated from natural language functions? Nature 2:609-619, 1976. 17. Helm N, Benson DF: Visual action therapy for global aphasia. Presented at the 16th annual meeting of the Academy of Aphasia, Chicago, 1978. 18. Skelly M, Schinsky L, Smith RW, et al: American Indian sign (Amerind) as a facilitator of verbalization for the oral verbal apraxic . J Speech Hear Dis 39:445-456, 1974.

Journal

Archives of NeurologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Apr 1, 1979

References

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