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Antibiotic Resistance Among Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae—Bangui, 1995

Antibiotic Resistance Among Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus... APPROXIMATELY 4 million children aged <5 years die worldwide each year from acute respiratory infections (ARI), most of which are pneumonia.1 Most pneumonia deaths result from bacterial infections, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) and Haemophilus influenzae (HI) are the most common bacterial etiologies.1 To provide data about antibiotic resistance and to assist the National ARI Control Program of the Central African Republic (CAR) (1995 population: 2.9 million) in choosing which antibiotics to recommend for the treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years, a survey of the antibiotic resistance of nasopharyngeal (NP) isolates of SP and HI cultured from children residing in Bangui (1995 population: 451000), CAR, was conducted during January 16-February 8,1995, by the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MOPHP) in collaboration with epidemiologists from CDC and microbiologists from the South African Institute for Medical Research. Bangui is the capital of and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Antibiotic Resistance Among Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae—Bangui, 1995

JAMA , Volume 277 (8) – Feb 26, 1997

Antibiotic Resistance Among Nasopharyngeal Isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae—Bangui, 1995

Abstract


APPROXIMATELY 4 million children aged <5 years die worldwide each year from acute respiratory infections (ARI), most of which are pneumonia.1 Most pneumonia deaths result from bacterial infections, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) and Haemophilus influenzae (HI) are the most common bacterial etiologies.1 To provide data about antibiotic resistance and to assist the National ARI Control Program of the Central African Republic (CAR) (1995 population: 2.9 million) in choosing which...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.1997.03540320023014
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

APPROXIMATELY 4 million children aged <5 years die worldwide each year from acute respiratory infections (ARI), most of which are pneumonia.1 Most pneumonia deaths result from bacterial infections, and Streptococcus pneumoniae (SP) and Haemophilus influenzae (HI) are the most common bacterial etiologies.1 To provide data about antibiotic resistance and to assist the National ARI Control Program of the Central African Republic (CAR) (1995 population: 2.9 million) in choosing which antibiotics to recommend for the treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years, a survey of the antibiotic resistance of nasopharyngeal (NP) isolates of SP and HI cultured from children residing in Bangui (1995 population: 451000), CAR, was conducted during January 16-February 8,1995, by the Ministry of Public Health and Population (MOPHP) in collaboration with epidemiologists from CDC and microbiologists from the South African Institute for Medical Research. Bangui is the capital of and

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 26, 1997

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