Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Antibacterial Properties of Lidocaine on Bacteria Isolated From Dermal Lesions

Antibacterial Properties of Lidocaine on Bacteria Isolated From Dermal Lesions Abstract • We studied the antibacterial properties of lidocaine and lidocaine with methylparaben, employing bacteria that were isolated from dermal lesions. Our study was significant because local anesthetics utilized before obtaining material for biopsy and/or culture may result in false-negative results. Killing curves were calculated to ascertain exposure times of bacteria to various concentrations of lidocaine with and without methylparaben that could affect recovery of viable bacteria from clinical specimens. The bacteria studied varied greatly in their susceptibility to lidocaine, with Neisseria species being the most sensitive. Greater inhibitory activity was noted against bacteria when methylparaben was present. Our study suggests that lower concentrations of lidocaine without methylparaben should be employed. (Arch Dermatol 1985;121:1157-1159) References 1. Jonnesco T: Remarks on general spinal analgesia. Br Med J 1909;2:1396-1401. 2. Murphy JT, Allen HF, Mangiara AB: Preparation, sterilization, and preservation of ophthalmic solutions: Experimental studies and a practical method. Arch Ophthalmol 1955;53:63-78. 3. Ravin CE, Latimer JM, Matsen JM: In vitro effects of lidocaine on anaerobic respiratory pathogens and strains of Hemophilus influenzae . Chest 1977;72:439-441.Crossref 4. Wimberley N, Willey S, Sullivan N, et al: Antibacterial properties of lidocaine . Chest 1979;76:37-40.Crossref 5. Bartlett JG, Alexander J, Mayhew J, et al: Should fiberoptic bronchoscopy aspirates be cultured ? Am Rev Respir Dis 1976;114:73-78. 6. Shelley WB, Miller MA: Electron microscopy, histochemistry, and microbiology of bacterial adhesion in trichomycosis axillaris . J Am Acad Dermatol 1984;10:1005-1014.Crossref 7. Schmidt RM, Rosenkranz HS: Antimicrobial activity of local anesthetics: Lidocaine and procaine . J Infect Dis 1970;121:597-607.Crossref 8. Kleinfeld J, Ellis PP: Inhibition of microorganisms by topical anesthetics . Appl Microbiol 1967;15:1296-1298. 9. Alexander JW, MacMillan BG: Infections of burn wounds , in Bennett J, Brachman P (eds): Hospital Infections . Boston, Little Brown & Co, 1979, pp 335-353. 10. Schneider M, Vildozola CW, Brooks S: Quantitative assessment of bacterial invasion of chronic ulcers . Am J Surg 1983;145:260-262.Crossref 11. Lawrence JC, Lilly HA: A quantitative method for investigating the bacteriology of skin: Its application to burns . Br J Exp Pathol 1972;53:550-559. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Dermatology American Medical Association

Antibacterial Properties of Lidocaine on Bacteria Isolated From Dermal Lesions

Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/antibacterial-properties-of-lidocaine-on-bacteria-isolated-from-dermal-p6jcwKkB0v
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0003-987X
eISSN
1538-3652
DOI
10.1001/archderm.1985.01660090071016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract • We studied the antibacterial properties of lidocaine and lidocaine with methylparaben, employing bacteria that were isolated from dermal lesions. Our study was significant because local anesthetics utilized before obtaining material for biopsy and/or culture may result in false-negative results. Killing curves were calculated to ascertain exposure times of bacteria to various concentrations of lidocaine with and without methylparaben that could affect recovery of viable bacteria from clinical specimens. The bacteria studied varied greatly in their susceptibility to lidocaine, with Neisseria species being the most sensitive. Greater inhibitory activity was noted against bacteria when methylparaben was present. Our study suggests that lower concentrations of lidocaine without methylparaben should be employed. (Arch Dermatol 1985;121:1157-1159) References 1. Jonnesco T: Remarks on general spinal analgesia. Br Med J 1909;2:1396-1401. 2. Murphy JT, Allen HF, Mangiara AB: Preparation, sterilization, and preservation of ophthalmic solutions: Experimental studies and a practical method. Arch Ophthalmol 1955;53:63-78. 3. Ravin CE, Latimer JM, Matsen JM: In vitro effects of lidocaine on anaerobic respiratory pathogens and strains of Hemophilus influenzae . Chest 1977;72:439-441.Crossref 4. Wimberley N, Willey S, Sullivan N, et al: Antibacterial properties of lidocaine . Chest 1979;76:37-40.Crossref 5. Bartlett JG, Alexander J, Mayhew J, et al: Should fiberoptic bronchoscopy aspirates be cultured ? Am Rev Respir Dis 1976;114:73-78. 6. Shelley WB, Miller MA: Electron microscopy, histochemistry, and microbiology of bacterial adhesion in trichomycosis axillaris . J Am Acad Dermatol 1984;10:1005-1014.Crossref 7. Schmidt RM, Rosenkranz HS: Antimicrobial activity of local anesthetics: Lidocaine and procaine . J Infect Dis 1970;121:597-607.Crossref 8. Kleinfeld J, Ellis PP: Inhibition of microorganisms by topical anesthetics . Appl Microbiol 1967;15:1296-1298. 9. Alexander JW, MacMillan BG: Infections of burn wounds , in Bennett J, Brachman P (eds): Hospital Infections . Boston, Little Brown & Co, 1979, pp 335-353. 10. Schneider M, Vildozola CW, Brooks S: Quantitative assessment of bacterial invasion of chronic ulcers . Am J Surg 1983;145:260-262.Crossref 11. Lawrence JC, Lilly HA: A quantitative method for investigating the bacteriology of skin: Its application to burns . Br J Exp Pathol 1972;53:550-559.

Journal

Archives of DermatologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Sep 1, 1985

References