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Anthropology and Medicine: Anthropology and Medicine

Anthropology and Medicine: Anthropology and Medicine Anthropology and Medicine, an international interdisciplinary journal, publishes original, peer-reviewed papers within the broad framework of medical anthropology. The journal aims to establish a critical platform for expanding theory and research through "cross-fertilisation of concepts at the borderline of culture and medicine." It attempts to address a wide audience of academics, practitioners, and students in the social sciences and in such medical sciences as primary care, psychiatry, public health, and nursing. The journal has an impressive list of renowned international scholars and researchers, including physician-anthropologist Arthur Kleinman of Harvard, on its 47-member editorial board. Anthropology and Medicine publishes four original papers per issue with 5000 to 8000 words for each article. The journal also has an extensive book review section and a section on courses taught in medical anthropology worldwide, including in medical school curricula. For example, at Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, second year medical students are required to enroll in a course entitled "Culture and Health." Several programs in France designed for doctors and medical students offer a university diploma in medical anthropology and other courses on anthropology and medicine. This section would be useful for medical school administrators in the United States who have an interest in broadening the scope of courses offered to medical students and practicing physicians. Many of these programs could be models for continuing education courses. Topics covered in the original papers published to date are eclectic. The special issue on the anthropology of contraception (vol 4, No. 2, 1997) stands out because of its cross-cultural perspective and focus on placing risks and benefits of contraceptives in the context of the social relations of everyday life. The articles complement biomedical studies on contraceptives by giving voice to the experience of providers and clients, users and nonusers, women and men. This is an excellent example of the linking of anthropology with medicine and should be especially informative for practitioners in reproductive health. The question has been raised in "Correspondence" (vol 4, No. 3, 1997) as to the relevancy of Anthropology and Medicine in medical practice. David Goldberg, an adolescent psychiatrist at St George's Hospital Medical School in London, sparked a lively debate when he expressed the hope "that Anthropology and Medicine will be able to link descriptions and theories of ‘clinical practice' with ‘clinical practice' itself in a series of dialogues and meta-dialogues," adding, "It may be naive to suggest that anthropological knowledge will stimulate future developments in ‘clinical practice.'" Goldberg was taken to task in a series of responses that offered insight into how anthropological theory and research can be used in clinical practice. Mitchell Weiss of the department of public health and epidemiology at the Swiss Tropical Institute summed up the debate well with his statement, "This new journal can be expected to provide a forum for ongoing reflection and reconstruction of an interdisciplinary relationship, and its inauguration is therefore an auspicious occasion for rethinking such questions as balance, purpose, and priority that inevitably shape the character of collaboration." MEDLINE does not index Anthropology and Medicine. Services such as Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstracts, Periodica Islamica, Social Planning/Policy and Development Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts do cover its contents. The journal in 1997 (Vol. 4, No.1) became the successor to British Medical Anthropology Review, which was published twice a year from 1993 through 1996. British Medical Anthropology Review was the successor to the British Medical Anthropology Society Newsletter, published October 1981 through summer 1993. Anthropology and Medicine offers a unique and free electronic service to all interested persons. The publisher's Scholarly Articles Research Alerting service will e-mail the contents of any of their journals, prior to each new issue being mailed, to all those registered with the publisher, whether journal subscribers or not. Registration can be completed any of three ways: on the Web at the Carfax Home Page, by sending an e-mail to Carfax (SARA@carfax.co.uk), or by mailing in an order form. Anthropology and Medicine shares the same domain as Social Science and Medicine, Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, Medical Anthropology, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Like these journals, it has a lot to offer in building the literature that links anthropology and medicine. This journal, however, is still in its infancy, so it is too soon to tell if it will become a viable vehicle for rethinking collaboration between the two fields. More likely than not, it will remain a journal read more by anthropologists than medical clinical practitioners, unless the latter work across cultures internationally or in multicultural settings. Academic medical and science libraries seeking to strengthen their collections in medical anthropology will want to consider subscribing to this title. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Anthropology and Medicine: Anthropology and Medicine

JAMA , Volume 280 (1) – Jul 1, 1998

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.280.1.101-JBK0701-6-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Anthropology and Medicine, an international interdisciplinary journal, publishes original, peer-reviewed papers within the broad framework of medical anthropology. The journal aims to establish a critical platform for expanding theory and research through "cross-fertilisation of concepts at the borderline of culture and medicine." It attempts to address a wide audience of academics, practitioners, and students in the social sciences and in such medical sciences as primary care, psychiatry, public health, and nursing. The journal has an impressive list of renowned international scholars and researchers, including physician-anthropologist Arthur Kleinman of Harvard, on its 47-member editorial board. Anthropology and Medicine publishes four original papers per issue with 5000 to 8000 words for each article. The journal also has an extensive book review section and a section on courses taught in medical anthropology worldwide, including in medical school curricula. For example, at Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, second year medical students are required to enroll in a course entitled "Culture and Health." Several programs in France designed for doctors and medical students offer a university diploma in medical anthropology and other courses on anthropology and medicine. This section would be useful for medical school administrators in the United States who have an interest in broadening the scope of courses offered to medical students and practicing physicians. Many of these programs could be models for continuing education courses. Topics covered in the original papers published to date are eclectic. The special issue on the anthropology of contraception (vol 4, No. 2, 1997) stands out because of its cross-cultural perspective and focus on placing risks and benefits of contraceptives in the context of the social relations of everyday life. The articles complement biomedical studies on contraceptives by giving voice to the experience of providers and clients, users and nonusers, women and men. This is an excellent example of the linking of anthropology with medicine and should be especially informative for practitioners in reproductive health. The question has been raised in "Correspondence" (vol 4, No. 3, 1997) as to the relevancy of Anthropology and Medicine in medical practice. David Goldberg, an adolescent psychiatrist at St George's Hospital Medical School in London, sparked a lively debate when he expressed the hope "that Anthropology and Medicine will be able to link descriptions and theories of ‘clinical practice' with ‘clinical practice' itself in a series of dialogues and meta-dialogues," adding, "It may be naive to suggest that anthropological knowledge will stimulate future developments in ‘clinical practice.'" Goldberg was taken to task in a series of responses that offered insight into how anthropological theory and research can be used in clinical practice. Mitchell Weiss of the department of public health and epidemiology at the Swiss Tropical Institute summed up the debate well with his statement, "This new journal can be expected to provide a forum for ongoing reflection and reconstruction of an interdisciplinary relationship, and its inauguration is therefore an auspicious occasion for rethinking such questions as balance, purpose, and priority that inevitably shape the character of collaboration." MEDLINE does not index Anthropology and Medicine. Services such as Linguistics and Language Behaviour Abstracts, Periodica Islamica, Social Planning/Policy and Development Abstracts, and Sociological Abstracts do cover its contents. The journal in 1997 (Vol. 4, No.1) became the successor to British Medical Anthropology Review, which was published twice a year from 1993 through 1996. British Medical Anthropology Review was the successor to the British Medical Anthropology Society Newsletter, published October 1981 through summer 1993. Anthropology and Medicine offers a unique and free electronic service to all interested persons. The publisher's Scholarly Articles Research Alerting service will e-mail the contents of any of their journals, prior to each new issue being mailed, to all those registered with the publisher, whether journal subscribers or not. Registration can be completed any of three ways: on the Web at the Carfax Home Page, by sending an e-mail to Carfax (SARA@carfax.co.uk), or by mailing in an order form. Anthropology and Medicine shares the same domain as Social Science and Medicine, Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry, Medical Anthropology, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly. Like these journals, it has a lot to offer in building the literature that links anthropology and medicine. This journal, however, is still in its infancy, so it is too soon to tell if it will become a viable vehicle for rethinking collaboration between the two fields. More likely than not, it will remain a journal read more by anthropologists than medical clinical practitioners, unless the latter work across cultures internationally or in multicultural settings. Academic medical and science libraries seeking to strengthen their collections in medical anthropology will want to consider subscribing to this title.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jul 1, 1998

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