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Anthrax Detection

Anthrax Detection The federal government's ability to detect Bacillus anthracis remains flawed, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported September 11. The report comes 11 years after spores of B anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, were mailed to members of Congress and the media in a still-unsolved bioterror attack. A 2005 GAO report recommended that federal agencies validate environmental sampling methods for detecting B anthracis and conduct studies to develop probability-based sampling approaches for indoor environments. Such activities were to be completed by fiscal year 2013, but delays are now expected. The authors of the latest GAO report noted that sampling methods for detecting B anthracis spores in indoor environments have yet to be validated, and they highlighted the problems of interagency cooperation (http://tinyurl.com/9ybndvt). Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Rep Fred Upton (R, Mich) and Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Chairman Rep Cliff Stearns (R, Fla) said in a statement, “Eleven years and $12 million after the first anthrax attack, it is unimaginable that those agencies responsible for detecting the anthrax and protecting the public are still unable to coordinate their efforts and implement GAO's recommendations.” (Photo credit: Eye of Science/www.sciencesource.com) The federal government has yet to validate sampling methods for detecting Bacillus anthracis spores, the bacterium that causes anthrax, a Congressional office reported. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA American Medical Association

Anthrax Detection

JAMA , Volume 308 (18) – Nov 14, 2012

Anthrax Detection

Abstract

The federal government's ability to detect Bacillus anthracis remains flawed, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported September 11. The report comes 11 years after spores of B anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, were mailed to members of Congress and the media in a still-unsolved bioterror attack. A 2005 GAO report recommended that federal agencies validate environmental sampling methods for detecting B anthracis and conduct studies to develop probability-based...
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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
0098-7484
eISSN
1538-3598
DOI
10.1001/jama.2012.14658
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The federal government's ability to detect Bacillus anthracis remains flawed, the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported September 11. The report comes 11 years after spores of B anthracis, the bacterium that causes anthrax, were mailed to members of Congress and the media in a still-unsolved bioterror attack. A 2005 GAO report recommended that federal agencies validate environmental sampling methods for detecting B anthracis and conduct studies to develop probability-based sampling approaches for indoor environments. Such activities were to be completed by fiscal year 2013, but delays are now expected. The authors of the latest GAO report noted that sampling methods for detecting B anthracis spores in indoor environments have yet to be validated, and they highlighted the problems of interagency cooperation (http://tinyurl.com/9ybndvt). Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Rep Fred Upton (R, Mich) and Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee Chairman Rep Cliff Stearns (R, Fla) said in a statement, “Eleven years and $12 million after the first anthrax attack, it is unimaginable that those agencies responsible for detecting the anthrax and protecting the public are still unable to coordinate their efforts and implement GAO's recommendations.” (Photo credit: Eye of Science/www.sciencesource.com) The federal government has yet to validate sampling methods for detecting Bacillus anthracis spores, the bacterium that causes anthrax, a Congressional office reported.

Journal

JAMAAmerican Medical Association

Published: Nov 14, 2012

Keywords: anthrax disease

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