Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Anterior Polar Cataract: A Clinical-Pathologic Correlation

Anterior Polar Cataract: A Clinical-Pathologic Correlation Figure 1. Intraoperative photograph of the right eye of a 6-year-old boy who was undergoing extraction of bilateral, congenital anterior polar cataracts. The photograph shows the anterior capsular plaque with a broad base attaching to the central lens capsule and extending into the anterior chamber without touching the cornea. Figure 2. Light microscopy (periodic acid–Schiff, original magnification ×200) microphotograph revealing probable fibrous metaplasia of the lens epithelium. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png JAMA Ophthalmology American Medical Association

Anterior Polar Cataract: A Clinical-Pathologic Correlation

Anterior Polar Cataract: A Clinical-Pathologic Correlation

Abstract

Figure 1. Intraoperative photograph of the right eye of a 6-year-old boy who was undergoing extraction of bilateral, congenital anterior polar cataracts. The photograph shows the anterior capsular plaque with a broad base attaching to the central lens capsule and extending into the anterior chamber without touching the cornea. Figure 2. Light microscopy (periodic acid–Schiff, original magnification ×200) microphotograph revealing probable fibrous metaplasia of the lens epithelium.
Loading next page...
 
/lp/american-medical-association/anterior-polar-cataract-a-clinical-pathologic-correlation-Yf8zotStUV
Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.
ISSN
2168-6165
eISSN
2168-6173
DOI
10.1001/jamaophthalmol.2013.565
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Figure 1. Intraoperative photograph of the right eye of a 6-year-old boy who was undergoing extraction of bilateral, congenital anterior polar cataracts. The photograph shows the anterior capsular plaque with a broad base attaching to the central lens capsule and extending into the anterior chamber without touching the cornea. Figure 2. Light microscopy (periodic acid–Schiff, original magnification ×200) microphotograph revealing probable fibrous metaplasia of the lens epithelium.

Journal

JAMA OphthalmologyAmerican Medical Association

Published: Jan 1, 2013

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$499/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month