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ANTERIOR DISLOCATION OF FIRST CERVICAL VERTEBRA SIMULATING CEREBRAL BIRTH INJURY IN INFANCY

ANTERIOR DISLOCATION OF FIRST CERVICAL VERTEBRA SIMULATING CEREBRAL BIRTH INJURY IN INFANCY BECAUSE pediatrician and the neurologist are so often confronted with the handicapped child showing evidence of paralysis and exhibiting seizures of one form or another due to cerebral birth injury, such signs and symptoms due to other causes are likely to be overlooked. It has long been recognized, but not sufficiently emphasized, that clinical pictures simulating cerebral injury can occur as the result of compression of the cervical cord. Compression of this type may be due to (1) tumors of the posterior fossa or the cervical cord or to bony exostoses in this location; (2) congenital anomalies of the region of the foramen magnum or the upper cervical spine, such as the Arnold-Chiari malformation or platybasia; (3) infections of the pharynx resulting in dislocations of the upper cervical spine,1 or (4) traumatic dislocations and fractures of the upper cervical spine.2 It is apparent from case reports of children http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png American journal of diseases of children American Medical Association

ANTERIOR DISLOCATION OF FIRST CERVICAL VERTEBRA SIMULATING CEREBRAL BIRTH INJURY IN INFANCY

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Publisher
American Medical Association
Copyright
Copyright © 1953 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved. Applicable FARS/DFARS Restrictions Apply to Government Use.
ISSN
0096-8994
eISSN
1538-3628
DOI
10.1001/archpedi.1953.02050070182006
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BECAUSE pediatrician and the neurologist are so often confronted with the handicapped child showing evidence of paralysis and exhibiting seizures of one form or another due to cerebral birth injury, such signs and symptoms due to other causes are likely to be overlooked. It has long been recognized, but not sufficiently emphasized, that clinical pictures simulating cerebral injury can occur as the result of compression of the cervical cord. Compression of this type may be due to (1) tumors of the posterior fossa or the cervical cord or to bony exostoses in this location; (2) congenital anomalies of the region of the foramen magnum or the upper cervical spine, such as the Arnold-Chiari malformation or platybasia; (3) infections of the pharynx resulting in dislocations of the upper cervical spine,1 or (4) traumatic dislocations and fractures of the upper cervical spine.2 It is apparent from case reports of children

Journal

American journal of diseases of childrenAmerican Medical Association

Published: Feb 1, 1953

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